sleep apnea bookEducation is important, which is why Dr. Mayoor Patel and Dr. David Dillard teamed up to write “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To,” which can be purchased at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sleep. Through the creation of this book, Dr. Patel and Dr. Dillard hope to help dentists across the country educate their patients of sleep apnea and the importance of treatment.

“It was a pleasure working with Dr. Dillard on this book. We hope that patients and their loved ones will purchase this book to better their lives through improved sleep,” said Dr. Mayoor Patel. “Sleep apnea can hinder many aspects of a person’s life, which is why the treatment should be convenient and easy. In this book we touch base on what sleep apnea is, the negative effects of not seeking treatment and the available treatment options other than CPAP.”

Obstructive sleep apnea is a silent killer. Dr. Patel works with Dr. Dillard to educate potential sufferers in “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To.” Sleep apnea quietly destroys memory, motivation, and even marriages. Sleep apnea sufferers run the risk of losing their jobs, delaying promotions, and straining relationships—important factors in a person’s life. Without diagnosis or treatment, lives are significantly altered and health diminishes. Read the rest of this entry

Portrait of mature woman sitting in countrysideFindings of a recently concluded research study at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland has revealed that Sleep apnea is directly related with the osteoporosis and bone fractures.

Nearly 54 million Americans over the age of 50 are affected by low bone mass, and about 10 million of them have osteoporosis, which leads to brittle bones and fractures.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that occurs commonly in this population as well, and has been linked to multiple adverse health effects, including high blood pressure, heart disease and depression.

Researchers at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland theorize that sleep apnea may be an unrecognized cause of osteoporosis because it seems to affect bone remodeling, a process necessary for bone health. During remodeling, mature bone is removed from the skeleton and new bone tissue is rebuilt, even while we sleep.

With detailed review of researches the conclusion derived by the researchers that deals with bone metabolism and found important indications that sleep apnea interrupts the bone remodeling process.

“If sleep disorders like obstructive sleep apnea affect bone metabolism, they may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for many patients, including those affected by sleep apnea in their early, bone modeling years,” said lead author Dr. Christine Swanson.

overweight pilotsFAA has now revised its policy for pilots who now will be allowed to keep flying while being evaluated for the sleep apnea disorder.Facing a backlash from pilots and aviation lobbying groups, the FAA has reversed course on a controversial medical policy that would have grounded overweight pilots until they underwent screening for obstructive sleep apnea.
The FAA’s new medical screening guidance follows more than a year of lobbying efforts on behalf of several aviation organizations, including AOPA, the National Business Aviation Association and the Experimental Aircraft Association. As first revealed by the agency late in 2013, the FAA’s chief federal air surgeon sought to require that any pilot with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater, and a neck size of 17 inches or greater, undergo obstructive sleep apnea screening prior to receiving a medical certificate.
The new policy, which takes effect March 2, will require overweight pilots who are diagnosed with OSA to receive treatment to continue flying.
AOPA President Mark Baker and NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen both applauded the policy change, calling the revised guidelines a “common-sense approach” to medical certification.

A Better Night’s Sleep for Your Kids

sleep for Kidskids continually waking up in the middle of the night could be a nightmare for both parents and children. But here are some advice and products to help get some “rest for the weary.”

There are three main causes of “night wakings.” The first is night terrors, or bad dreams. Adults are able to shake it off and go back to sleep. It’s not that easy, obviously, for kids. Very young children often do not know what woke them and older children usually end up in the parent’s bed because naturally, they’re scared.”

The second is because of restless sleep: without a solid bedtime routine, kids are subject to a restless night’s sleep. It is always better to develop a routine each night to help your child relax and wind down from the day. (i.e., keep the light off, speak calmly, don’t stay in the room for a long time, read them a bedtime story, etc). Also, avoid caffeine and sugar before bed.

The third reason could be because of medical issues. If your child is waking in the middle of the night often, or complains of aches or pains, check with your pediatrician. Children are not immune to sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia. Read the rest of this entry

napA short nap can help relieve stress and bolster the immune systems of men who slept only two hours the previous night, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Lack of sleep is recognized as a public health problem. Insufficient sleep can contribute to reduced productivity as well as vehicle and industrial accidents, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, people who sleep too little are more likely to develop chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression.

Nearly three in 10 adults reported they slept an average of six hours or less a night, according to the National Health Interview Survey.

“Our data suggests a 30-minute nap can reverse the hormonal impact of a night of poor sleep,” said one of the JCEM study’s authors, Brice Faraut, PhD, of the Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité in Paris, France. “This is the first study that found napping could restore biomarkers of neuroendocrine and immune health to normal levels.” Read the rest of this entry

Firefighters May Have Undiagnosed Sleep Disorders

firefighters sleep problemsA recently concluded research study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has revealed that many firefighters may have undiagnosed sleep disorders.

Researchers examined nearly 7,000 firefighters from 66 fire departments across the United States. Of those, 37% suffered from a sleep disorder, such as sleep apnea, insomnia, shift-work disorder and restless leg syndrome.

“These firefighters have also been found prone to car accidents or to have fallen asleep while driving”, the study findings have recorded. Chronic health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, depression and anxiety also have large probability among these firefighters, according to the research revelations. Read the rest of this entry

sleepImageAcross the globe more than a million exhausted people with sleep apnea—a sleep and breathing disorder caused when throat muscles relax and block the airway during sleep—get into car accidents, causing over a thousand deaths every year.

 Apnea is linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, an additional $3.4 billion in medical costs, and $16 billion in auto collision costs. Even though apnea has telltale signs (loud snoring, daytime fatigue), it remains totally undiagnosed in almost 75 percent of the people.

Polysomnography, the only diagnostic sleep study for sleep apnea is not cheap generally. the standard medical sleep study, requires a medical technician to attach 22 wires to a person’s body and monitor them all night long. The average cost is nearly $3,000. This is quite an out of the pocket expense for anyone. Follow-up tests are even more cost bearing and burdensome. The idea of doing clinical sleep studies once a month to monitor progress is a diagnostic crack-pipe fantasy. Read the rest of this entry

Over the shelf sleep drugsAlmost everyone suffers from trouble sleeping at one time or another. Insomnia – the inability to sleep – isn’t a single disorder itself, but rather a general symptom like fever or pain.

People with insomnia may be plagued by trouble falling asleep, unwelcome awakenings during the night, and fitful sleep. They may experience daytime drowsiness, yet still be unable to nap, and are often anxious and irritable or forgetful and unable to concentrate.

Nearly half of insomnia stems from underlying psychological or emotional issues. Stressful events, mild depression, or an anxiety disorder can keep people awake at night. When the underlying cause is properly treated, insomnia usually improves. If not, additional strategies to help promote sleep may be needed. Read the rest of this entry

3 Simple Ways to Get More Restful Sleep

restful sleepingEven people without insomnia can have trouble getting a good night’s rest. Many things can interfere with restorative sleep – crazy work schedules, anxiety, trouble putting down the smartphone, even what you eat and drink.

The following three simple steps can help you sleep better.

Cut down on caffeine

Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep than people who don’t drink caffeine. Once they drift off, their sleep is shorter and lighter. For some, a single cup of coffee in the morning means a sleepless night. That may be because caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night.

People who suffer from insomnia should avoid caffeine as much as possible, since its effects can endure for many hours. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 p.m., or noon if they are especially caffeine-sensitive. Read the rest of this entry

Ibuprofen Safer Than Morphine After Sleep Apnea Surgery

Ibuprofen in TonsillectomyFindings of a recently concluded research study (Motherisk Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and by McMaster University and McMaster Children’s Hospital ) revealed that treating postoperative pain with morphine subsequent to the tonsillectomy surgery which is commonly and effectively used to treat childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children.

This study identified a significant risk for potentially fatal breathing disruption when morphine is administered at home after surgery to treat pain in children who undergo tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy. Prescribing Ibuprofen instead, after Pediatric Sleep Apnea Surgery would be a better option.

The detailed findings of this research study as published in the January 26 online edition of Pediatrics  also established that ibuprofen is a safe and effective alternative. Read the rest of this entry

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