Sleep Problems and Work Performance

  • sleep and work performance43% of Americans between 13 and 64 say they rarely or never get a good night’s sleep on weeknights
  • 60% of Americans say they experience a sleep problem every night or almost every night, such as waking in the night, waking up too early, or feeling un-refreshed when they get up in the morning
  • 61% of Americans say they use a computer at least a few nights a week within an hour of going to bed
  • Americans drink, on average, three 12-ounce caffeinated beverages on a weekday
  • 74% of workers over 30 who report not getting adequate sleep say that sleepiness affects their work
  • 9% of Americans say they are likely to fall asleep at an inappropriate moment, such as during a meeting or while driving
  • 71% of Americans say they have a television in their bedrooms
  • 11% of those with televisions in the bedroom say they keep the TV on all night
  • 39% of Americans say they have a computer in their bedrooms
  • 40.6 million American workers – 30% of the civilian workforce – sleep less than 6 hours per night (“short sleep duration”)
  • The problem is particularly acute for night-shift workers: 44% of them sleep less than 6 hours per night, compared with 28.8% of people who work typical daytime hours
  • Workers between the ages of 30 and 64 were more likely to report short sleep duration; workers over 65 were least likely to report short sleep duration
  • Workers with college degrees or more education were least likely to report short sleep duration
  • Segmenting the data industry by industry, workers reported anywhere from 24.1% (other services, except public administration) to 41.6% (mining) incidence of short sleep duration. Some industries relevant to our readership: finance and insurance industry (27.4%); professional, scientific,and technical services (28.2%); and information (28.3%)
  • 23.2% of American workers suffer from insomnia
  • People with insomnia did not report higher levels of absenteeism compared to non-sufferers, but reported significantly higher levels of presenteeism (lower productivity while at work)
  • Workers with insomnia lost an average of 7.8 days of work performance per year due to presenteeism related directly to sleep problems
  • Generalizing to the total U.S. workforce, insomnia costs American companies $63.2 billion

Sources: National Sleep Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and “Insomnia and the Performance of U.S. Workers,” Sleep, 2011

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Filed under: Daytime SleepinessInsomniaSleepSleep ApneaSleep DeprivationSleep Disordered BreathingSleep DisordersSleep Problems

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