Cardiovascular Disease Archives

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea experinecSleepApneaDisorder/CHICAGO/[Press Release]/ Physical wellbeing is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.” Dr. Rotskoff provides comprehensive screening for children and adults with OSA in Chicago, nocturnal sleep studies, and treatment using the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea Causes Nervous System Tumors

cerebromaSleep apnea patients have more risk to suffer from malignant cerebroma.The conclusion was drawn on the basis of a research study recently concluded at the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital in China.

Huang Chun-hao, director of the Sleep Center of the hospital’s branch in Talin Township of Chiayi County, Southern Taiwan, released his report on the “morbidity of the central nervous system tumors induced by sleep apnea” at a seminar hosted by the Taiwan Society of Sleep Medicine at the Shin Kong Wu Ho Su Memorial Hospital in Taipei.

Huang said he has just completed a 10-year track of 112,555 adults who were diagnosed with sleep apnea between 2000 and 2003, as well as another 112,555 adults who did not have sleep apnea, finding that 2.96 out of every 10,000 adults with sleep apnea suffered malignant cerebroma, compared to 1.66 for those without. Cerebroma refers to abnormal brain tissue mass.

According to Huang after adjusting statistical information based on all related elements such as age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipemia, cerebrovascular disease, and Parkinson’s disease, he found the possibility for patients with sleep apnea to develop malignant cerebroma is 1.47-times higher than that of those without.

The doctor also cited foreign studies as indicating that women who enjoy good sleep see their possibility of suffering breast cancer drop significantly, while those who fail to sleep well have an increased possibility of suffering from benign colorectal adenoma. Those who are plagued by bad sleep and a shortness of oxygen face a higher risk of developing various cancers.

The effectiveness of the immune system decreases when the body has less oxygen, which, in turn, offers a better environment for cancer cell growth, according to Huang.

sleepingSleep apnea have been estimated to affect adversely more than six percent of the working population across the globe. Ironically almost 80 percent of these people don’t even know that they are suffering from such a deadly sleep disorder.

A recently concluded research study involving  more than 4200 workers at Philips Electronics in the Netherlands revealed startling finding. Philips and a research team from the Netherlands University of Twente worked together to identify just how often workers are victimized by the commonest form of sleep apnea, an intermittent blockage in the upper airways while sleeping that’s called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS).

According to the US National Institutes of Health the surprisingly serious condition often slips by without being diagnosed because, you are sleeping. However, if you live with anybody else, you should pay attention if they complain that you snore. When you try to breathe through the blockage, it can cause extremely loud and disruptive snoring as your body struggles to catch its breath. And that’s the first sign of a problem. Read the rest of this entry

Snoring Children May Have Sleep Apnea Too

snoring in childrenSnoring is very common among the children. Nearly 10 per cent children snore most nights. Snoring is a noise that occurs during sleep when the child is breathing in and there is some blockage of air passing through the back of the mouth.

The opening and closing of the air passage causes a vibration of the tissues in the throat. The loudness is affected by how much air is passing through and how fast the throat tissue is vibrating.

Children aged three years or older tend to snore during the deeper stages of sleep. Primary snoring is defined as snoring that is not associated with more serious problems such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), frequent arousals from sleep, or inability of the lungs to breathe in sufficient oxygen. Read the rest of this entry

pregnant womenWomen with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers have recommended use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing, during sleep. These pauses can last from at least ten seconds to minutes, and may occur five to 30 times or more an hour; this can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers conducted an observational study with an objective to measure the incidence of OSA among pregnant and reproductive women.  Read the rest of this entry

strokeAccording to the findings of a recently concluded research study the atrial fibrillation (AF) may play an intermediary role in the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stroke, research findings suggest.

Resaerchers at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, USA observed that  patients with OSA who had a stroke had significantly higher rates of atrial fibrillation, even after accounting for potential confounders, than their peers without stroke.

“This could potentially indicate that patients with OSA and AF need aggressive treatment to mitigate the risk of future stroke,” the researchers say, although they caution that as theirs was a case-control study, a causal relationship between AF and stroke could not be established. Read the rest of this entry

childhood-obesityObesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s triple the rate from just one generation ago.

A New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study found 40 percent of Vineland children between ages 6 and 11 are overweight, compared to 21 percent nationally.

Almost 90 percent of children aren’t eating enough vegetables. Majority of the children aren’t physically active for at least 60 minutes a day. This unhealthy reality has long-term consequences, too.

As weight increases so do the risks for coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon), hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea and respiratory problems and gynecological problems. Read the rest of this entry

breathing excercisesYoga Breathing

According to Dr. Paulose, a plastic and laser surgeon, yoga does not cure sleep apnea, but it can help reduce symptoms. He suggests the ujjayi pranayama, or hissing breath, to increase lung capacity and remove throat blockages. Sit in a lotus position, breathe deeply through your nostrils until calm, then inhale forcefully through the nostrils while contracting your neck muscles to produce a low, throbbing sound. Hold this inhaled breath as long as possible, then close one nostril with your fingers and slowly exhale through the other nostril. Repeat with the other nostril and perform three to five times each day. Read the rest of this entry

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Comorbidities

COPDResults of epidemiological studies have shown that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with comorbidities, the most serious and prevalent being cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, and cachexia.

Mechanistically, environmental risk factors such as smoking, unhealthy diet, exacerbations, and physical inactivity or inherent factors such as genetic background and ageing contribute to this association.

No convincing evidence has been provided to suggest that treatment of COPD would reduce comorbidities, although some indirect indications are available. Clear evidence that treatment of comorbidities improves COPD is also lacking, although observational studies would suggest such an effect for statins, ? blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme blockers and receptor antagonists.

Large-scale prospective studies are needed. Reduction of common risk factors seems to be the most powerful approach to reduce comorbidities.

Whether reduction of so-called spill-over of local inflammation from the lungs or systemic inflammation with inhaled or systemic anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively, would also reduce COPD-related comorbidities is doubtful. [TheLancet.com]

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