Heart Disease Archives

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

Insomnia May Lead To Heart Disease

insomniaA recently concluded research study revealed that insomnia may be related to at least one form of heart disease.

Research findings published in the latest issue of the European Heart Journal established that people who suffered with multiple insomnia symptoms were three times more likely to develop heart failure. Heart failure is caused by a weakened heart muscle which can no longer pump blood sufficiently through the body.

Three key symptoms of insomnia were focused by the researchers. According to lead researcher, Dr Lars Laugsand, from the Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, in Trondheim, Norway, a substantial increase in heart failure involved the presence of all three indicators.  Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea riskA recently concluded research has revealed that people who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea but not diabetes have the same quantum of heart risks as those with both diabetes and the breathing disorder.

Romanian researchers examined the arterial function of 20 people without diabetes who had moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, 20 people with diabetes and OSA, and 20 healthy individuals.

After analysing how well their arteries were able to function through a series of tests, the researchers  found that all participants with OSA had stiffer arteries than those without the condition, regardless of whether or not they were diabetic . In addition, arterial stiffness was similar in both the non-diabetic OSA and diabetic OSA groups. Read the rest of this entry

central sleep apneaAlong with obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea is one of the two main forms of sleep apnea, a dangerous class of sleep disorders characterized by an interruption of breathing of 10 seconds or more numerous times an hour during sleep.

Dangers of Central Sleep Apnea 

Although central sleep apnea is less common than obstructive sleep apnea, it is just as dangerous.

Central sleep apnea can result in severe morning headaches, daytime fatigue, anxiety, depression, short-term memory problems and difficulty focusing.  Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea1 Sleep apnea is a common and potentially deadly sleep disorder in which your breathing may stop for 10 seconds or more multiple times per hour.

Types of Sleep Apnea

There are two primary forms of sleep apnea:
– Obstructive sleep apnea
– Central sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is the result of an airway obstruction that is typically caused by overly relaxed muscles in the throat. When these muscles relax, tissue in the throat can collapse, narrowing the airway and preventing adequate oxygen intake. Read the rest of this entry

Night Time Sleep Apnea Risk For Diabetics

diabeticsA recently concluded research evaluation of a patient revealed that even perfect control on blood glucose level does not help, they found.

The patient, with a HBA1C of 9.3 per cent, was evaluated for a 24-hour period for three things — blood glucose levels during sleep, heart rhythm and sleep hygiene. He had three to four episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose). Though he did not exhibit sleep disturbances, if hypoglycaemia remained untreated, it might become fatal.

A patient with hypoglycaemia, when awake, would typically experience sweating and tremors and eating a chocolate would result in a rise in glucose levels. But, these symptoms are absent while a patient is sleeping. “Hypoglycaemia has been recognised as a potential cause of death ever since the introduction of insulin therapy. Read the rest of this entry

A nightly breathing treatment may do more than help people with obstructive sleep apnea get a good night’s rest — it may also help prevent heart failure.

In a study published in Circulation: Heart Failure, a journal of the American Heart Association, researchers in the U.K. discovered that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can cause changes in the heart’s shape and function, similar to the effects of hypertension. These changes include increased mass, thickening of the heart wall and reduced pumping ability.

But, six months after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, the abnormalities returned to near-normal measurements in sleep apnea patients. Read the rest of this entry

Demanding schedules and high stress levels compel almost 78% of the corporate employees to sleep less than 6 hours every day leading to variety of sleep disorders and other health problems.

The ASSOCHAM survey findings revealed that “Loss of sleep has wide ranging effects including daytime fatigue, physical discomfort, psychological stress, performance deterioration, low-pain threshold and increase absenteeism”.

Women are at more risk as they suffer with more sleep problems than men. More than 50% of women said they frequently experience a sleep problem. Read the rest of this entry

A Currently concluded research study based on the large health insurance database revealed that people who’d suffered sudden deafness were more probable to have a previous diagnosis of sleep apnea than a comparison group without hearing loss.

Taiwanese health insurance data analysis revealed that the absolute difference is actually small: 1.7 percent of those with hearing loss had sleep apnea in comparison to 1.2 percent without hearing trouble.

The health records of nearly one million Taiwanese evaluated by Dr. Jau-Jiuan Sheu, of Taipei Medical University Hospital. His team of researchers found that almost 3,200 had been diagnosed with sudden deafness between 2000 and 2008. Comparison was made with other five people of same age and sex without hearing loss. Out of those 19,000 people in total, 240 had been diagnosed with sleep apnea before the episode of sudden deafness occurred. Read the rest of this entry

Avisha Free Sleep Apnea Guide

Disturbing forecasts have prompted the Aviisha Medical Institute, LLC to  release a free guide to sleep apnea. A new study published in the Lancet  predicts that by 2030, 164 million Americans will suffer from obesity.

Given  obesity’s high correlation with sleep apnea, experts are beginning to brace for  an obesity-sleep apnea epidemic of epic proportions.

Current estimates predict that 1 in every 5 Americans suffers from mild sleep  apnea and 1 in every 15 from moderate sleep apnea or worse. These numbers are  expected to climb in coming years, and yet most sleep apnea sufferers have no  idea they have the condition.

“Studies estimate that between 80 and 90% of sufferers are undiagnosed and  need treatment,” said Dr. Avi Ishaaya, a sleep boarded physician and Medical  Director of the Aviisha Medical Institute, LLC.

“This is a serious problem when  you consider how untreated sleep apnea can devastate the cardiovascular system  and damage a person’s quality of life.” Sleep apnea has been linked to stroke,  heart failure, diabetes, hypertension, depression, erectile dysfunction, memory  loss, and more. Read the rest of this entry

Related Posts with Thumbnails