Polysomnography Archives

sleepImageAcross the globe more than a million exhausted people with sleep apnea—a sleep and breathing disorder caused when throat muscles relax and block the airway during sleep—get into car accidents, causing over a thousand deaths every year.

 Apnea is linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, an additional $3.4 billion in medical costs, and $16 billion in auto collision costs. Even though apnea has telltale signs (loud snoring, daytime fatigue), it remains totally undiagnosed in almost 75 percent of the people.

Polysomnography, the only diagnostic sleep study for sleep apnea is not cheap generally. the standard medical sleep study, requires a medical technician to attach 22 wires to a person’s body and monitor them all night long. The average cost is nearly $3,000. This is quite an out of the pocket expense for anyone. Follow-up tests are even more cost bearing and burdensome. The idea of doing clinical sleep studies once a month to monitor progress is a diagnostic crack-pipe fantasy. Read the rest of this entry

Among patients who were identified as likely having moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, treatment based in primary care was not clinically inferior to treatment at a specialist sleep center for improvement in daytime sleepiness scores, according to a study appearing in the March 13 issue of JAMA.

“Obstructive sleep apnea with accompanying daytime sleepiness was estimated during the early 1990s to affect between 2 percent and 4 percent of middle-aged adults. With growing awareness of the public health implications of untreated disease and rising obesity rates that have increased the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, there has been a steady demand for sleep service provision in specialist centers and growing waiting lists for sleep physician consultation and laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG),” according to background information in the article. Read the rest of this entry

sleep center1WellStar Health System is celebrating helping people sleep better with the 20th anniversary of WellStar’s Sleep Medicine Program.

The Sleep Medicine Program was launch in March of 1993 with a two-beded sleep center at WellStar Kennestone Hospital. Today, WellStar’s Sleep Medicine Program has 20 beds at four locations in metro Atlanta and has performed nearly 30,000 sleep studies.

About 40 million people in the United States suffer from chronic long-term sleep disorders, and an additional 20 million people experience occasional sleep problems. The WellStar Sleep Medicine Program treats sleep disorders ranging from insomnia to sleep apnea.

Sleep centers are located at WellStar Douglas, Paulding and Windy Hill Hospitals and the WellStar Acworth Health Park. The Sleep Medicine program now offers home sleep testing and plans to open two additional sleep centers at South Cherokee Medical Center in Woodstock and at the new East Cobb Health Park, slated to open September 2014. For more information, call 770-956-STAR or visit wellstar.org.

pregnant womenWomen with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers have recommended use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing, during sleep. These pauses can last from at least ten seconds to minutes, and may occur five to 30 times or more an hour; this can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers conducted an observational study with an objective to measure the incidence of OSA among pregnant and reproductive women.  Read the rest of this entry

sleep disorder in military personnelA recently concluded research study attempted describing the prevalence of sleep disorders in military personnel referred for polysomnography and identify relationships between demographic characteristics, comorbid diagnoses, and specific sleep disorders.

This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with the military medical treatment facility involving active duty military personnel with diagnostic polysomnogram in 2010.

Primary sleep disorder rendered by review of polysomnogram and medical record by a board certified sleep medicine physician. Demographic characteristics and conditions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), anxiety, depression, and pain syndromes determined by medical record review. Read the rest of this entry

Home Sleep Apnea Testing At Kendallville

home sleep apnea testingSleep apnea is a deadly disorder that occurs when a person’s breathing is interrupted during sleep. People with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times.

The home sleep apnea testing started in the month of January. Till the availability of home based sleep apnea testing only the sleep centers at Cameron Hospital in Angola, DeKalb Health in Auburn, Parkview Noble Hospital in Kendallville and Parkview LaGrange Hospital in LaGrange used to offer such tests. Sleep testing at a sleep center involved spending the night in the hospital and wearing wires connected to monitors.

Weldon Cline, the Parkview Noble polysomonographer technologist says that some people may be eligible to have these tests done in the comfort of their own homes.  Read the rest of this entry

Researchers have measured and confirmed the existence of a possible link between sleep apnea and post-surgical delirium.

“The association between sleep apnea and postoperative delirium is big news because it may offer us a way to control postoperative delirium which can be devastating,” said senior author Madan Kwatra, Ph.D., a research team member  at the Duke University Medical Center.

The study findings will be published in the April 2012 issue of journal Anesthesiology.

Delirium is not a minor consequence. The condition involves an acute and fluctuating consciousness and ability to understand, and is associated with health problems and higher risk of death right after surgery. Delirium is a strong predictor of mortality even 10 years after surgery. Read the rest of this entry

Home sleep testing devices have become popular among medical providers to  determine whether or not patients may have obstructive sleep apnea.  Left  untreated, sleep apnea can account for higher risks of accidents, obesity, heart  disease, diabetes, and even colon cancer.

Medical professionals upload raw data  off the machine through the pm-Assist?  service that is scored by Registered Polysomnographic Technicians (RPSGT),  interpreted by Board Certified Sleep Physicians, and in as little as 24 hours  receive a diagnostic report.

“The growth of our pm-Assist program parallels the growth of home sleep  testing in the industry,” commented Dr. Benjamin Gerson, Chief Medical Director  of University Services, the parent  company of pm-Assist. Read the rest of this entry

As the number of patients diagnosed with sleep apnea is increasing the costs related to the health insurance is also increasing exponentially. This skyrocketing of the insurer’s sleep apnea related costs has now compelled the insurance companies to change their health coverage policies for the disorder.

A sleep apnea diagnosis usually requires patients undergo tests overnight in a sleep lab; some patients spend two nights in the lab to separately test for sleep apnea and to try a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine. Insurers often spend $1,900 for one overnight stay.

As a result of this increased spending, some experts are concerned that overnight tests to diagnose apnea are over-prescribed. Medicare payments for sleep testing increased from $62 million in 2001 to $235 million in 2009.

This contrasts effective home sleep tests that cost less than a fifth of the lab version. Although Medicare began paying for home sleep tests in 2008, the tests have had only modest growth. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep disorders often remain undiagnosed. Untreated sleep disorders among police officers may adversely affect their health and safety and pose a risk to the public.

Researchers examined and evaluated associations between sleep disorder risk and self-reported health, safety, and performance outcomes in police officers.

Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of North American police officers participating in either an online or an on-site screening (n=4957) and monthly follow-up surveys (n=3545 officers representing 15 735 person-months) between July 2005 and December 2007. A total of 3693 officers in the United States and Canada participated in the online screening survey, and 1264 officers from a municipal police department and a state police department participated in the on-site survey.             Read the rest of this entry

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