Sleep Apnea News Archives

Firefighters May Have Undiagnosed Sleep Disorders

firefighters sleep problemsA recently concluded research study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has revealed that many firefighters may have undiagnosed sleep disorders.

Researchers examined nearly 7,000 firefighters from 66 fire departments across the United States. Of those, 37% suffered from a sleep disorder, such as sleep apnea, insomnia, shift-work disorder and restless leg syndrome.

“These firefighters have also been found prone to car accidents or to have fallen asleep while driving”, the study findings have recorded. Chronic health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, depression and anxiety also have large probability among these firefighters, according to the research revelations. Read the rest of this entry

sleepImageAcross the globe more than a million exhausted people with sleep apnea—a sleep and breathing disorder caused when throat muscles relax and block the airway during sleep—get into car accidents, causing over a thousand deaths every year.

 Apnea is linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, an additional $3.4 billion in medical costs, and $16 billion in auto collision costs. Even though apnea has telltale signs (loud snoring, daytime fatigue), it remains totally undiagnosed in almost 75 percent of the people.

Polysomnography, the only diagnostic sleep study for sleep apnea is not cheap generally. the standard medical sleep study, requires a medical technician to attach 22 wires to a person’s body and monitor them all night long. The average cost is nearly $3,000. This is quite an out of the pocket expense for anyone. Follow-up tests are even more cost bearing and burdensome. The idea of doing clinical sleep studies once a month to monitor progress is a diagnostic crack-pipe fantasy. Read the rest of this entry

How Sleep and Excercise are Inter-related

sleep and excerciseWhile logic dictates that regular exercise can boost sleep, a small new study finds that for people suffering from sleep disturbances or insomnia, the answer may not be so simple.

Research from Northwestern University in the US finds that for insomniacs, sleep may have more of an impact on exercise than exercise has on sleep, at least initially.

For the research, the scientists first looked at a 2010 study from the same university involving 17 adults with insomnia. All of the subjects, mostly female, were in their 60s and sedentary. After 16 weeks of physical activity training, subjects reported improved sleep. But the scientists wanted to know more, such as did exercise have an immediate effect on the subjects’ sleep? Read the rest of this entry

melatoninSleep doctors say many people who are diagnosed with insomnia are actually suffering a condition called delayed sleep phase disorder.

Physicians say up to 15 per cent of people who are told they have insomnia actually have the disorder, which makes it very hard for people to fall to sleep at night and difficult to get up in the morning.

Professor Ron Grunstein from the Woolcock Institute in Sydney says it is difficult to diagnose delayed sleep phase disorder.

“Most people who have it don’t know they have a disorder,” he said.

“They just think they have trouble getting off to sleep and trouble waking up.” Read the rest of this entry

3325-71214-calciumChevy Chase, Maryland — Taking a calcium supplement of up to 1,000 mg per day can help women live longer, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Calcium, an essential nutrient for bone health, is commonly found in dairy products as well as vitamins. Although calcium is an essential nutrient for bone health, past studies have linked calcium supplements to heart disease risk. Researchers analyzing data from the large-scale Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study sought to clarify this issue and found moderate doses of calcium supplements had a beneficial effect in women.

“Our study found daily use of calcium supplements was associated with a lower risk of death among women,” said the study’s lead author, David Goltzman, MD, of McGill University in Montreal, Canada. “The benefit was seen for women who took doses of up to 1,000 mg per day, regardless of whether the supplement contained vitamin D.” Read the rest of this entry

sleep researcher

Erin Evans, a sleep researcher at the Brigham, is testing an experimental light for the International Space Station.

In the quest to understand the mystery of sleep, researcher Erin Evans has studied the effects of sleep deprivation in high-stress work situations, from astronauts to police and doctors.

Evans, a sleep medicine fellow at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, also helps hundreds of families improve the sleeping habits of their children. Even though she’s a sleep expert, Evans admits she’s constantly challenged by her 2-year-old son.

“I thought I knew everything about sleep,” she said, “but he’s putting me through the wringer.”

“Sleep in a young infant is a moving target, and while one 4-month-old might sleep through the night, another may need to nurse a few times. I believe there is no “one-size-fits-all” strategy. The most important thing is to develop a plan that is realistic and the family can implement with consistency”. Read the rest of this entry

sleep geneticsSleepApneaDisorder/[Press Release]/COLUMBUS, Ohio/ As more and more data indicate that sleep apnea is linked with cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and even an increase in deaths related to car accidents, an international consortium spanning five continents is working together to unravel the genetic basis for the condition.

From a scientific discovery standpoint, researchers in the Sleep Apnea Genetics International Consortium (SAGIC) are embarking on a massive undertaking. Considering those researchers are working in seven different time zones, the amount of biomedical information the group is intending to gather, combine and analyze, becomes even more remarkable. Read the rest of this entry

transcend cpap deviceSleepApneaDisorder/[Press Release]/MINNEAPOLIS/New Transcend® CPAP offers peace of mind for travelers with sleep apnea and fits in the palm of your hand

An innovative new product called Transcend® is providing peace of mind for travelers with sleep apnea. Transcend is the world’s smallest, lightest, and most portable continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and battery system and is made by Somnetics International Inc., the Minneapolis-based innovator of sleep apnea products.

Transcend offers reliable sleep apnea therapy for campers, over-the-road drivers, business travelers, and people who vacation on cruise ships, boats, motorcycles or are frequently in an airplane. And because it is the most portable and compact CPAP system in world, Transcend is easy to transport and use with or without a direct power source. Weighing about one pound, Transcend can fit in the palm of your hand and is about the size of a soda can. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep apneaA recently concluded research study has revealed that obstructive sleep apnea, a common form of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), is associated with increased rates of ADHD-like behavioral problems in children as well as other adaptive and learning problems.

“This study provides some helpful information for medical professionals consulting with parents about treatment options for children with SDB that, although it may remit, there are considerable behavioral risks associated with continued SDB,” said Michelle Perfect, PhD, the study’s lead author and assistant professor in the school psychology program in the department of disability and psychoeducational studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea experinecSleepApneaDisorder/CHICAGO/[Press Release]/ Physical wellbeing is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.” Dr. Rotskoff provides comprehensive screening for children and adults with OSA in Chicago, nocturnal sleep studies, and treatment using the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Read the rest of this entry

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