Clinical Research Archives

Ibuprofen Safer Than Morphine After Sleep Apnea Surgery

Ibuprofen in TonsillectomyFindings of a recently concluded research study (Motherisk Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and by McMaster University and McMaster Children’s Hospital ) revealed that treating postoperative pain with morphine subsequent to the tonsillectomy surgery which is commonly and effectively used to treat childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children.

This study identified a significant risk for potentially fatal breathing disruption when morphine is administered at home after surgery to treat pain in children who undergo tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy. Prescribing Ibuprofen instead, after Pediatric Sleep Apnea Surgery would be a better option.

The detailed findings of this research study as published in the January 26 online edition of Pediatrics  also established that ibuprofen is a safe and effective alternative. Read the rest of this entry

sleep researcher

Erin Evans, a sleep researcher at the Brigham, is testing an experimental light for the International Space Station.

In the quest to understand the mystery of sleep, researcher Erin Evans has studied the effects of sleep deprivation in high-stress work situations, from astronauts to police and doctors.

Evans, a sleep medicine fellow at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, also helps hundreds of families improve the sleeping habits of their children. Even though she’s a sleep expert, Evans admits she’s constantly challenged by her 2-year-old son.

“I thought I knew everything about sleep,” she said, “but he’s putting me through the wringer.”

“Sleep in a young infant is a moving target, and while one 4-month-old might sleep through the night, another may need to nurse a few times. I believe there is no “one-size-fits-all” strategy. The most important thing is to develop a plan that is realistic and the family can implement with consistency”. Read the rest of this entry

Low Energy Diet Improves Sleep Apnea

low energy dietObese men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who followed a very low energy diet may maintain their initial improvements one year later.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, assessed whether early improvements in obstructive sleep apnea after a very low energy diet were maintained one year later in 63 men, aged 30 to 65 years, with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m². Participants were treated with continuous positive airway pressure and underwent a one-year weight loss program consisting of nine weeks of a very low energy diet followed by a weight loss maintenance program, which was completed by 44 men. The severity of sleep apnea was measured using the apnea hypopnea index. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea Causes Nervous System Tumors

cerebromaSleep apnea patients have more risk to suffer from malignant cerebroma.The conclusion was drawn on the basis of a research study recently concluded at the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital in China.

Huang Chun-hao, director of the Sleep Center of the hospital’s branch in Talin Township of Chiayi County, Southern Taiwan, released his report on the “morbidity of the central nervous system tumors induced by sleep apnea” at a seminar hosted by the Taiwan Society of Sleep Medicine at the Shin Kong Wu Ho Su Memorial Hospital in Taipei.

Huang said he has just completed a 10-year track of 112,555 adults who were diagnosed with sleep apnea between 2000 and 2003, as well as another 112,555 adults who did not have sleep apnea, finding that 2.96 out of every 10,000 adults with sleep apnea suffered malignant cerebroma, compared to 1.66 for those without. Cerebroma refers to abnormal brain tissue mass.

According to Huang after adjusting statistical information based on all related elements such as age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipemia, cerebrovascular disease, and Parkinson’s disease, he found the possibility for patients with sleep apnea to develop malignant cerebroma is 1.47-times higher than that of those without.

The doctor also cited foreign studies as indicating that women who enjoy good sleep see their possibility of suffering breast cancer drop significantly, while those who fail to sleep well have an increased possibility of suffering from benign colorectal adenoma. Those who are plagued by bad sleep and a shortness of oxygen face a higher risk of developing various cancers.

The effectiveness of the immune system decreases when the body has less oxygen, which, in turn, offers a better environment for cancer cell growth, according to Huang.

pregnant womenWomen with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers have recommended use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing, during sleep. These pauses can last from at least ten seconds to minutes, and may occur five to 30 times or more an hour; this can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers conducted an observational study with an objective to measure the incidence of OSA among pregnant and reproductive women.  Read the rest of this entry

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Leads to Memory Deficit

memory deficitA recently concluded research study published in the journal Sleep examined episodic memory performance in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results from individual studies examining the impact of OSA on episodic memory performance. The performance of individuals with OSA was compared to healthy controls or normative data.

Forty-two studies were included, comprising 2,294 adults with untreated OSA and 1,364 healthy controls. Studies that recorded information about participants at baseline prior to treatment interventions were included in the analysis.

Participants were assessed with tasks that included a measure of episodic memory: immediate recall, delayed recall, learning, and/or recognition memory. Read the rest of this entry

MiscarriageInfertility and miscarriages can be aggravated by obstructive sleep apnea or upper airway resistance syndrome. A recent study showed that having 3 miscarriages increases your chances of having heart disease by over 5 times normal.

If you think about the physiology, it makes sense: Breathing pauses during sleep, whether or not it’s an apnea, can cause a physiologic state of stress. In other words, you’ll have too much adrenaline, which you need to fight or run from danger. It’s also common knowledge that if you’re in a fight or flight situation, the last thing you need to do is to reproduce. Physiologically, stress has a way of diminishing or reducing nervous innervation and blood flow to your reproductive organs and digestive system (as well as your skin, hands and feet). Read the rest of this entry

Obstructive Sleep Apnea:New Research Explorations

OSA1An important new finding has come from an observational study linking obstructive sleep apnea with cancer mortality. Based on 22 years of follow-up data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort, investigators reported that mortality was higher for people with mild obstructive sleep apnea , moderate obstructive sleep apnea , and severe obstructive sleep apnea .

Cancer mortality in this context refers to all types of cancer, with lung cancer the most frequent. The researchers cited preclinical studies showing that chronic or intermittent hypoxia—the latter mimicking clinical obstructive sleep apnea—can lead to tumor growth and resistance to radiotherapy. This new research provides a possible mechanistic link between obesity and cancer, and will help to increase awareness of obstructive sleep apnea by broadening its potential detrimental outcomes beyond the cardiovascular system. Whether the purported effects of obstructive sleep apnea on cancer mortality will be reported in other cohorts or can be mitigated by intervention is unclear. Read the rest of this entry

Breathing Disorders Linked with Insomnia

 Insomnia is a sleep disorder that compels the sufferer to stay awake or reduces the capacity to fall asleep.Insomnia is also a transient condition due to emotional stress, anxiety or a response to certain medications or medical conditions.

Insomnia occurrence without any known medical reason is termed as primary insomnia. Chronic insomnia is diagnosed if the condition lasts for longer than a month.

insomniaInsomnia has significant physiological and psychological consequences. Restorative sleep is as important to our well-being as healthy food and regular exercise.

Insomnia diminishes quality of life up to large extent. If unresolved, chronic insomnia causes slowed reactions, mental health issues such as depression or anxiety, physical ailments such as obesity and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases as well as lower performance at work or at school. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep disordered breathingA research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting mal-adaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

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