Sleep Apnea Awareness Archives

sleep apnea bookEducation is important, which is why Dr. Mayoor Patel and Dr. David Dillard teamed up to write “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To,” which can be purchased at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sleep. Through the creation of this book, Dr. Patel and Dr. Dillard hope to help dentists across the country educate their patients of sleep apnea and the importance of treatment.

“It was a pleasure working with Dr. Dillard on this book. We hope that patients and their loved ones will purchase this book to better their lives through improved sleep,” said Dr. Mayoor Patel. “Sleep apnea can hinder many aspects of a person’s life, which is why the treatment should be convenient and easy. In this book we touch base on what sleep apnea is, the negative effects of not seeking treatment and the available treatment options other than CPAP.”

Obstructive sleep apnea is a silent killer. Dr. Patel works with Dr. Dillard to educate potential sufferers in “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To.” Sleep apnea quietly destroys memory, motivation, and even marriages. Sleep apnea sufferers run the risk of losing their jobs, delaying promotions, and straining relationships—important factors in a person’s life. Without diagnosis or treatment, lives are significantly altered and health diminishes. Read the rest of this entry

Jobee Knight

Sleep inducing foodAccording to the National Sleep Foundation, almost six out of ten Americans report having insomnia and sleep problems at least a few nights a week.  The side effects and dangers of sleep medications continue to grow.  There are some special sleep-inducing foods and minerals that have been shown to have a calming effect on restless sleep.

Some of the types of insomnia include sleep apnea, which involves interrupted breathing and snoring during the night; insomnia from hormone fluctuations such as with menstruation or menopause; restless leg syndrome, which causes sensations in the legs such as creeping, crawling, pulling, or pain; and insomnia from the use of medications, caffeine or alcohol.  Read the rest of this entry

women with sleep apneaSleep Apnea has long been thought to be a condition only experienced by middle-aged overweight men. The stereotypical snoring man who gasps for breath while sleeping and sometimes stops breathing altogether should no longer be the norm. Women make up a third of the total diagnosed population with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and manufacturers, sleep clinics, and retailers are starting to notice. New products have come to market in the last few months aimed solely at women patients.

Thirty-three percent of new patients who underwent a sleep study that resulted in OSA were women. It’s not surprising, of course, that women should suffer the same pains as men when it comes to sleep. However, diagnosis in women is usually harder to come by and sometimes overlooked. Why? There are a few reasons. First is the stereotype. Doctors too are often mislead by the stereotype and will not consider OSA as a possible reason for a woman’s tiredness or reduction in quality of life. Second, women tend to snore less often than men. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea experinecSleepApneaDisorder/CHICAGO/[Press Release]/ Physical wellbeing is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.” Dr. Rotskoff provides comprehensive screening for children and adults with OSA in Chicago, nocturnal sleep studies, and treatment using the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Read the rest of this entry

Low Energy Diet Improves Sleep Apnea

low energy dietObese men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who followed a very low energy diet may maintain their initial improvements one year later.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, assessed whether early improvements in obstructive sleep apnea after a very low energy diet were maintained one year later in 63 men, aged 30 to 65 years, with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m². Participants were treated with continuous positive airway pressure and underwent a one-year weight loss program consisting of nine weeks of a very low energy diet followed by a weight loss maintenance program, which was completed by 44 men. The severity of sleep apnea was measured using the apnea hypopnea index. Read the rest of this entry

sleeping with infantsParents must focus on providing a safe sleeping environment for infants and babies.

Preliminary data collected in the New Hampshire revealed that 81 infants died in their sleep from 2006 through 2012. “This type of death is so easily preventable,” said Dr. Thomas Andrew, the state’s chief medical examiner, referring to co-sleeping and unsafe sleep environment deaths. “Of the infants sleeping alone, many listed risks such as fluffy bedding, soft mattresses, over-bundling, or other unsafe sleep environments,” Andrew said.

Probable potential risks and dangers include obstructing the infant’s mouth and nose, which can lead to asphyxia, or re-breathing exhaled carbon dioxide, which can also induce death. Read the rest of this entry

78% People Unaware That They Have Sleep Apnea

sleep awarenessPhilips Electronics has announced the results of an extensive new scientific study into sleep apnea, conducted over the last two years by Philips in collaboration with University of Twente (Enschede, the Netherlands), Medisch Spectrum Twente Hospital (Enschede, the Netherlands), and patients’ organization ApneuVereniging.

The study, which surveyed 4,206 Philips employees in the Netherlands, revealed that 6.4% of them suffered from sleep apnea. A striking finding was that 78% of the people surveyed who reported symptoms of sleep apnea were entirely unaware that they were suffering from this sleep disorder.

Despite that fact that many people are unaware that they suffer from sleep apnea, the condition can have serious consequences for their health. It is also not difficult to treat. The aim of the study was therefore to gather up-to-date scientific information about how often sleep apnea, the commonest form of which is Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) caused by obstruction of the upper airway, occurs. Read the rest of this entry

Take Charge of Your Sleep Apnea

sleep apnea awarenessUntreated sleep apnea, a condition that affects one in five Americans, can have dire health consequences. Sleep apnea is manageable through therapy, but because successful therapy is so individualized, getting to the right solution can be daunting. Learning from other patients’ stories can be critical to success, and a new effort launched today brings new sleep apnea patients together with these therapy veterans.

The American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA), the leading national patient organization for the condition and Wake Up to Sleep (WakeUpToSleep.com), an online patient support community, are launching an educational initiative to wake Americans up to the dangers of untreated sleep apnea and the treatment options available to improve their quality of life. The ASAA offers a comprehensive set of resources for those searching for information, and Wake Up to Sleep has one-on-one sleep coaches for those who have been newly diagnosed with sleep apnea or those who are struggling to control it. The joint initiative features a series of educational events leading up to Sleep Apnea Awareness Day on April 18th including a Twitter chat, discussion and the opportunity to submit video and written patient testimonials showcasing their treatment success. Read the rest of this entry

sleepingSleep apnea have been estimated to affect adversely more than six percent of the working population across the globe. Ironically almost 80 percent of these people don’t even know that they are suffering from such a deadly sleep disorder.

A recently concluded research study involving  more than 4200 workers at Philips Electronics in the Netherlands revealed startling finding. Philips and a research team from the Netherlands University of Twente worked together to identify just how often workers are victimized by the commonest form of sleep apnea, an intermittent blockage in the upper airways while sleeping that’s called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS).

According to the US National Institutes of Health the surprisingly serious condition often slips by without being diagnosed because, you are sleeping. However, if you live with anybody else, you should pay attention if they complain that you snore. When you try to breathe through the blockage, it can cause extremely loud and disruptive snoring as your body struggles to catch its breath. And that’s the first sign of a problem. Read the rest of this entry

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