Sleep Apnea Effects Archives

sleep apnea bookEducation is important, which is why Dr. Mayoor Patel and Dr. David Dillard teamed up to write “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To,” which can be purchased at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sleep. Through the creation of this book, Dr. Patel and Dr. Dillard hope to help dentists across the country educate their patients of sleep apnea and the importance of treatment.

“It was a pleasure working with Dr. Dillard on this book. We hope that patients and their loved ones will purchase this book to better their lives through improved sleep,” said Dr. Mayoor Patel. “Sleep apnea can hinder many aspects of a person’s life, which is why the treatment should be convenient and easy. In this book we touch base on what sleep apnea is, the negative effects of not seeking treatment and the available treatment options other than CPAP.”

Obstructive sleep apnea is a silent killer. Dr. Patel works with Dr. Dillard to educate potential sufferers in “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To.” Sleep apnea quietly destroys memory, motivation, and even marriages. Sleep apnea sufferers run the risk of losing their jobs, delaying promotions, and straining relationships—important factors in a person’s life. Without diagnosis or treatment, lives are significantly altered and health diminishes. Read the rest of this entry

Portrait of mature woman sitting in countrysideFindings of a recently concluded research study at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland has revealed that Sleep apnea is directly related with the osteoporosis and bone fractures.

Nearly 54 million Americans over the age of 50 are affected by low bone mass, and about 10 million of them have osteoporosis, which leads to brittle bones and fractures.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that occurs commonly in this population as well, and has been linked to multiple adverse health effects, including high blood pressure, heart disease and depression.

Researchers at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland theorize that sleep apnea may be an unrecognized cause of osteoporosis because it seems to affect bone remodeling, a process necessary for bone health. During remodeling, mature bone is removed from the skeleton and new bone tissue is rebuilt, even while we sleep.

With detailed review of researches the conclusion derived by the researchers that deals with bone metabolism and found important indications that sleep apnea interrupts the bone remodeling process.

“If sleep disorders like obstructive sleep apnea affect bone metabolism, they may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for many patients, including those affected by sleep apnea in their early, bone modeling years,” said lead author Dr. Christine Swanson.

gestational diabetesWomen who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes bear seven times probability of suffering with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)  compared to the other pregnant women. A most recent research study concluded and due to be published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) revealed

Pregnancy is associated with sleep disturbances. Sleep is more disturbed in GDM than in P-NGT women. There is a strong association between GDM and OSA.

Prime objective of the research study was to assess the relationship between pregnancy, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) , and GDM.

“It is common for pregnant women to experience sleep disruptions, but the risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea increases substantially in women who have gestational diabetes,” said Sirimon Reutrakul, MD, who conducted the research at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Nearly 75 percent of the participants in our study who had gestational diabetes also suffered from obstructive sleep apnea.”  Read the rest of this entry

women with sleep apneaSleep Apnea has long been thought to be a condition only experienced by middle-aged overweight men. The stereotypical snoring man who gasps for breath while sleeping and sometimes stops breathing altogether should no longer be the norm. Women make up a third of the total diagnosed population with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and manufacturers, sleep clinics, and retailers are starting to notice. New products have come to market in the last few months aimed solely at women patients.

Thirty-three percent of new patients who underwent a sleep study that resulted in OSA were women. It’s not surprising, of course, that women should suffer the same pains as men when it comes to sleep. However, diagnosis in women is usually harder to come by and sometimes overlooked. Why? There are a few reasons. First is the stereotype. Doctors too are often mislead by the stereotype and will not consider OSA as a possible reason for a woman’s tiredness or reduction in quality of life. Second, women tend to snore less often than men. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep apneaA recently concluded research study has revealed that obstructive sleep apnea, a common form of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), is associated with increased rates of ADHD-like behavioral problems in children as well as other adaptive and learning problems.

“This study provides some helpful information for medical professionals consulting with parents about treatment options for children with SDB that, although it may remit, there are considerable behavioral risks associated with continued SDB,” said Michelle Perfect, PhD, the study’s lead author and assistant professor in the school psychology program in the department of disability and psychoeducational studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea experinecSleepApneaDisorder/CHICAGO/[Press Release]/ Physical wellbeing is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.” Dr. Rotskoff provides comprehensive screening for children and adults with OSA in Chicago, nocturnal sleep studies, and treatment using the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Read the rest of this entry

Low Energy Diet Improves Sleep Apnea

low energy dietObese men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who followed a very low energy diet may maintain their initial improvements one year later.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, assessed whether early improvements in obstructive sleep apnea after a very low energy diet were maintained one year later in 63 men, aged 30 to 65 years, with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m². Participants were treated with continuous positive airway pressure and underwent a one-year weight loss program consisting of nine weeks of a very low energy diet followed by a weight loss maintenance program, which was completed by 44 men. The severity of sleep apnea was measured using the apnea hypopnea index. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea Causes Nervous System Tumors

cerebromaSleep apnea patients have more risk to suffer from malignant cerebroma.The conclusion was drawn on the basis of a research study recently concluded at the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital in China.

Huang Chun-hao, director of the Sleep Center of the hospital’s branch in Talin Township of Chiayi County, Southern Taiwan, released his report on the “morbidity of the central nervous system tumors induced by sleep apnea” at a seminar hosted by the Taiwan Society of Sleep Medicine at the Shin Kong Wu Ho Su Memorial Hospital in Taipei.

Huang said he has just completed a 10-year track of 112,555 adults who were diagnosed with sleep apnea between 2000 and 2003, as well as another 112,555 adults who did not have sleep apnea, finding that 2.96 out of every 10,000 adults with sleep apnea suffered malignant cerebroma, compared to 1.66 for those without. Cerebroma refers to abnormal brain tissue mass.

According to Huang after adjusting statistical information based on all related elements such as age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipemia, cerebrovascular disease, and Parkinson’s disease, he found the possibility for patients with sleep apnea to develop malignant cerebroma is 1.47-times higher than that of those without.

The doctor also cited foreign studies as indicating that women who enjoy good sleep see their possibility of suffering breast cancer drop significantly, while those who fail to sleep well have an increased possibility of suffering from benign colorectal adenoma. Those who are plagued by bad sleep and a shortness of oxygen face a higher risk of developing various cancers.

The effectiveness of the immune system decreases when the body has less oxygen, which, in turn, offers a better environment for cancer cell growth, according to Huang.

Homeschooled Teens Get Healthier Sleep

teenagers sleep problemsA recently concluded research study revealed that the teenagers who are homeschooled benefit from healthier sleep habits than those who go to most private and public schools.

The findings provide additional evidence of teens’ altered biological clocks and support an argument for starting traditional high school later in the morning.

“We have a school system that is set up so that the youngest children, who are awake very early in the morning, start school latest, and our adolescents, who need sleep the most, are being asked to wake up and go to school at a time when their brains should physiologically be asleep,” said Lisa Meltzer, PhD, a sleep psychologist at National Jewish Health in Denver, and lead author of the study. Read the rest of this entry

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