Sleep Apnea in Children Archives

A Better Night’s Sleep for Your Kids

sleep for Kidskids continually waking up in the middle of the night could be a nightmare for both parents and children. But here are some advice and products to help get some “rest for the weary.”

There are three main causes of “night wakings.” The first is night terrors, or bad dreams. Adults are able to shake it off and go back to sleep. It’s not that easy, obviously, for kids. Very young children often do not know what woke them and older children usually end up in the parent’s bed because naturally, they’re scared.”

The second is because of restless sleep: without a solid bedtime routine, kids are subject to a restless night’s sleep. It is always better to develop a routine each night to help your child relax and wind down from the day. (i.e., keep the light off, speak calmly, don’t stay in the room for a long time, read them a bedtime story, etc). Also, avoid caffeine and sugar before bed.

The third reason could be because of medical issues. If your child is waking in the middle of the night often, or complains of aches or pains, check with your pediatrician. Children are not immune to sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep apneaA recently concluded research study has revealed that obstructive sleep apnea, a common form of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), is associated with increased rates of ADHD-like behavioral problems in children as well as other adaptive and learning problems.

“This study provides some helpful information for medical professionals consulting with parents about treatment options for children with SDB that, although it may remit, there are considerable behavioral risks associated with continued SDB,” said Michelle Perfect, PhD, the study’s lead author and assistant professor in the school psychology program in the department of disability and psychoeducational studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

Homeschooled Teens Get Healthier Sleep

teenagers sleep problemsA recently concluded research study revealed that the teenagers who are homeschooled benefit from healthier sleep habits than those who go to most private and public schools.

The findings provide additional evidence of teens’ altered biological clocks and support an argument for starting traditional high school later in the morning.

“We have a school system that is set up so that the youngest children, who are awake very early in the morning, start school latest, and our adolescents, who need sleep the most, are being asked to wake up and go to school at a time when their brains should physiologically be asleep,” said Lisa Meltzer, PhD, a sleep psychologist at National Jewish Health in Denver, and lead author of the study. Read the rest of this entry

Snoring Children May Have Sleep Apnea Too

snoring in childrenSnoring is very common among the children. Nearly 10 per cent children snore most nights. Snoring is a noise that occurs during sleep when the child is breathing in and there is some blockage of air passing through the back of the mouth.

The opening and closing of the air passage causes a vibration of the tissues in the throat. The loudness is affected by how much air is passing through and how fast the throat tissue is vibrating.

Children aged three years or older tend to snore during the deeper stages of sleep. Primary snoring is defined as snoring that is not associated with more serious problems such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), frequent arousals from sleep, or inability of the lungs to breathe in sufficient oxygen. Read the rest of this entry

childhood-obesityObesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s triple the rate from just one generation ago.

A New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study found 40 percent of Vineland children between ages 6 and 11 are overweight, compared to 21 percent nationally.

Almost 90 percent of children aren’t eating enough vegetables. Majority of the children aren’t physically active for at least 60 minutes a day. This unhealthy reality has long-term consequences, too.

As weight increases so do the risks for coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon), hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea and respiratory problems and gynecological problems. Read the rest of this entry

clarity allergy center chicagoSleepApneaDisorder/[Press Release ]/ CHICAGO/ — Physical well-being is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.”  Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Loss Among Teenage Students

teenage sleep lossDespite sleep deprivation being a problem, people don’t recognize why teenagers feel quite sleepy often and how to fix it. Easiest blame-targets are mobile phones and computers along with homework and extra-curricular activities.

High tech gadgets, technology and schoolwork do have their place in sleep deprivation, these reasons aren’t the entire problem among teens and always being “just tired.” Most people don’t understand that if teens don’t start trying to alter their sleep habits, long-lasting damage, such as difficulties with weight, mood and grades, could occur. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep disordered breathingA research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting mal-adaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

sleep disordered breathing and snoring in childrenSleep disturbances are nowadays a public health concern throughout the world. They affect millions of people, and their prevalence is increasing not only in adults but also in children. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is one of the most common sleep disturbances; it represents a continuum of symptoms from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). While the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in adults is 2–10 %, the prevalence of snoring is much higher. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among children and adolescents has been reported to range between 1 and 3 % and that of snoring between 7 and 25 %.

It is alarming that overweight and obesity are becoming more common in children and adolescents in many developed countries. A recent report revealed that 10 % of children and 26 % of adolescents are overweight in Finland. Excess body fat is a well-recognized risk factor for Sleep-disordered breathing in adults, but it has also been proposed to be an important risk factor for paediatric Sleep-disordered breathing . In children, traditional risk factors for Sleep-disordered breathing include adenotonsillar hypertrophy, deviations in craniofacial morphology and dental occlusion. Thus, the pathogenesis of Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children seems to be complex and multifactorial.  Read the rest of this entry

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