Insomnia Archives

A Better Night’s Sleep for Your Kids

sleep for Kidskids continually waking up in the middle of the night could be a nightmare for both parents and children. But here are some advice and products to help get some “rest for the weary.”

There are three main causes of “night wakings.” The first is night terrors, or bad dreams. Adults are able to shake it off and go back to sleep. It’s not that easy, obviously, for kids. Very young children often do not know what woke them and older children usually end up in the parent’s bed because naturally, they’re scared.”

The second is because of restless sleep: without a solid bedtime routine, kids are subject to a restless night’s sleep. It is always better to develop a routine each night to help your child relax and wind down from the day. (i.e., keep the light off, speak calmly, don’t stay in the room for a long time, read them a bedtime story, etc). Also, avoid caffeine and sugar before bed.

The third reason could be because of medical issues. If your child is waking in the middle of the night often, or complains of aches or pains, check with your pediatrician. Children are not immune to sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia. Read the rest of this entry

Firefighters May Have Undiagnosed Sleep Disorders

firefighters sleep problemsA recently concluded research study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has revealed that many firefighters may have undiagnosed sleep disorders.

Researchers examined nearly 7,000 firefighters from 66 fire departments across the United States. Of those, 37% suffered from a sleep disorder, such as sleep apnea, insomnia, shift-work disorder and restless leg syndrome.

“These firefighters have also been found prone to car accidents or to have fallen asleep while driving”, the study findings have recorded. Chronic health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, depression and anxiety also have large probability among these firefighters, according to the research revelations. Read the rest of this entry

Over the shelf sleep drugsAlmost everyone suffers from trouble sleeping at one time or another. Insomnia – the inability to sleep – isn’t a single disorder itself, but rather a general symptom like fever or pain.

People with insomnia may be plagued by trouble falling asleep, unwelcome awakenings during the night, and fitful sleep. They may experience daytime drowsiness, yet still be unable to nap, and are often anxious and irritable or forgetful and unable to concentrate.

Nearly half of insomnia stems from underlying psychological or emotional issues. Stressful events, mild depression, or an anxiety disorder can keep people awake at night. When the underlying cause is properly treated, insomnia usually improves. If not, additional strategies to help promote sleep may be needed. Read the rest of this entry

3 Simple Ways to Get More Restful Sleep

restful sleepingEven people without insomnia can have trouble getting a good night’s rest. Many things can interfere with restorative sleep – crazy work schedules, anxiety, trouble putting down the smartphone, even what you eat and drink.

The following three simple steps can help you sleep better.

Cut down on caffeine

Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep than people who don’t drink caffeine. Once they drift off, their sleep is shorter and lighter. For some, a single cup of coffee in the morning means a sleepless night. That may be because caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night.

People who suffer from insomnia should avoid caffeine as much as possible, since its effects can endure for many hours. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 p.m., or noon if they are especially caffeine-sensitive. Read the rest of this entry

How Sleep and Excercise are Inter-related

sleep and excerciseWhile logic dictates that regular exercise can boost sleep, a small new study finds that for people suffering from sleep disturbances or insomnia, the answer may not be so simple.

Research from Northwestern University in the US finds that for insomniacs, sleep may have more of an impact on exercise than exercise has on sleep, at least initially.

For the research, the scientists first looked at a 2010 study from the same university involving 17 adults with insomnia. All of the subjects, mostly female, were in their 60s and sedentary. After 16 weeks of physical activity training, subjects reported improved sleep. But the scientists wanted to know more, such as did exercise have an immediate effect on the subjects’ sleep? Read the rest of this entry

melatoninSleep doctors say many people who are diagnosed with insomnia are actually suffering a condition called delayed sleep phase disorder.

Physicians say up to 15 per cent of people who are told they have insomnia actually have the disorder, which makes it very hard for people to fall to sleep at night and difficult to get up in the morning.

Professor Ron Grunstein from the Woolcock Institute in Sydney says it is difficult to diagnose delayed sleep phase disorder.

“Most people who have it don’t know they have a disorder,” he said.

“They just think they have trouble getting off to sleep and trouble waking up.” Read the rest of this entry

excercise before sleepFindings of a recent survey revealed that physical exercise before sleep may be helpful. Almost 1000 adults representing ages 23 to 60, participated in this survey and it was observed that those who were the “vigorous exercisers” had double the probability of having good night’s sleep every night compared to those who were the “non-exercisers”.

“There seemed to be a dose-response effect,” said Dr Christopher Kline, a sleep researcher at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “The more you exercise, the better you’ll sleep.”

But “the biggest bang for your buck was from no-exercisers to light-exercisers”, Dr Kline said. “You get the most benefit from exercise when you move from no exercise to just a little exercise.” Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

Insomnia May Lead To Heart Disease

insomniaA recently concluded research study revealed that insomnia may be related to at least one form of heart disease.

Research findings published in the latest issue of the European Heart Journal established that people who suffered with multiple insomnia symptoms were three times more likely to develop heart failure. Heart failure is caused by a weakened heart muscle which can no longer pump blood sufficiently through the body.

Three key symptoms of insomnia were focused by the researchers. According to lead researcher, Dr Lars Laugsand, from the Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, in Trondheim, Norway, a substantial increase in heart failure involved the presence of all three indicators.  Read the rest of this entry

Mothers Are Sleep Deprived Than Fathers

father-mother-and-boy-sleepingA recently concluded survey results established the facts that the mothers are officially sleep deprived compared to fathers. They take longer to get off to sleep, are more likely to wake in the night and suffer more sleep disturbance from their children.

It is well recognized that women are poorer sleepers compared to the men, but findings from The Great British Sleep Survey show mothers fare worse than anyone.

Overall, mothers spend 10 minutes longer on average trying to get to sleep, and almost another 10 minutes extra awake during the night than fathers.The survey of over 21,000 UK adults found men better sleepers than women.  Read the rest of this entry

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