Sleep Deprivation Archives

napA short nap can help relieve stress and bolster the immune systems of men who slept only two hours the previous night, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Lack of sleep is recognized as a public health problem. Insufficient sleep can contribute to reduced productivity as well as vehicle and industrial accidents, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, people who sleep too little are more likely to develop chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression.

Nearly three in 10 adults reported they slept an average of six hours or less a night, according to the National Health Interview Survey.

“Our data suggests a 30-minute nap can reverse the hormonal impact of a night of poor sleep,” said one of the JCEM study’s authors, Brice Faraut, PhD, of the Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité in Paris, France. “This is the first study that found napping could restore biomarkers of neuroendocrine and immune health to normal levels.” Read the rest of this entry

Over the shelf sleep drugsAlmost everyone suffers from trouble sleeping at one time or another. Insomnia – the inability to sleep – isn’t a single disorder itself, but rather a general symptom like fever or pain.

People with insomnia may be plagued by trouble falling asleep, unwelcome awakenings during the night, and fitful sleep. They may experience daytime drowsiness, yet still be unable to nap, and are often anxious and irritable or forgetful and unable to concentrate.

Nearly half of insomnia stems from underlying psychological or emotional issues. Stressful events, mild depression, or an anxiety disorder can keep people awake at night. When the underlying cause is properly treated, insomnia usually improves. If not, additional strategies to help promote sleep may be needed. Read the rest of this entry

3 Simple Ways to Get More Restful Sleep

restful sleepingEven people without insomnia can have trouble getting a good night’s rest. Many things can interfere with restorative sleep – crazy work schedules, anxiety, trouble putting down the smartphone, even what you eat and drink.

The following three simple steps can help you sleep better.

Cut down on caffeine

Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep than people who don’t drink caffeine. Once they drift off, their sleep is shorter and lighter. For some, a single cup of coffee in the morning means a sleepless night. That may be because caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night.

People who suffer from insomnia should avoid caffeine as much as possible, since its effects can endure for many hours. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 p.m., or noon if they are especially caffeine-sensitive. Read the rest of this entry

High Earners Get Most Effective Sleep

sleepRich people sleep well at night. According to the findings of a recently concluded sleep research study by the Sleep Council a  healthy pay packet is the most important factor in getting a good night’s rest.

The study conducted on more than 5,000 adults found dividing lines based on income, with 83 per cent of people earning £75,000 or above saying they slept very well or fairly well most nights – and had never resorted to sleep remedies.

High earners were more likely to share their bed each night with a partner, but also admit to using their laptop as the last thing they do before going to bed. Read the rest of this entry

sleep researcher

Erin Evans, a sleep researcher at the Brigham, is testing an experimental light for the International Space Station.

In the quest to understand the mystery of sleep, researcher Erin Evans has studied the effects of sleep deprivation in high-stress work situations, from astronauts to police and doctors.

Evans, a sleep medicine fellow at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, also helps hundreds of families improve the sleeping habits of their children. Even though she’s a sleep expert, Evans admits she’s constantly challenged by her 2-year-old son.

“I thought I knew everything about sleep,” she said, “but he’s putting me through the wringer.”

“Sleep in a young infant is a moving target, and while one 4-month-old might sleep through the night, another may need to nurse a few times. I believe there is no “one-size-fits-all” strategy. The most important thing is to develop a plan that is realistic and the family can implement with consistency”. Read the rest of this entry

excercise before sleepFindings of a recent survey revealed that physical exercise before sleep may be helpful. Almost 1000 adults representing ages 23 to 60, participated in this survey and it was observed that those who were the “vigorous exercisers” had double the probability of having good night’s sleep every night compared to those who were the “non-exercisers”.

“There seemed to be a dose-response effect,” said Dr Christopher Kline, a sleep researcher at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “The more you exercise, the better you’ll sleep.”

But “the biggest bang for your buck was from no-exercisers to light-exercisers”, Dr Kline said. “You get the most benefit from exercise when you move from no exercise to just a little exercise.” Read the rest of this entry

crying babyMothers of newborns face a common dilemma with crying babies waking up at night. Waking up in the middle of the night is the most common concern that parents of infants report to pediatricians.

According to the findings of a study published in Developmental Psychology, a majority of infants are best left to self-soothe and fall back to sleep on their own.

By six months of age, most babies sleep through the night, awakening their mothers only about once per week. However, not all children follow this pattern of development.

Researchers measured patterns of nighttime sleep awakenings in infants ages six to 36 months. It revealed two groups: sleepers and transitional sleepers. If you measure them while they are sleeping, all babies—like all adults—move through a sleep cycle every 1 1/2 to 2 hours where they wake up and then return to sleep.Some of them do cry and call out when they awaken, and that is called ‘not sleeping through the night. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea experinecSleepApneaDisorder/CHICAGO/[Press Release]/ Physical wellbeing is not the only thing impaired by disrupted sleep patterns. While we’ve all experienced a sluggish day after a poor night’s sleep, adults with untreated obstructive sleep apnea can jeopardize much more than a productive day at the office. Drowsy, fatigued drivers have reduced reaction times and decision-making skills, posing a significant risk to themselves and others on the road. Dr. Brian Rotskoff of Clarity Allergy Center tests for and treats adult sleep apnea and childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at his three Chicagoland offices.

Dr. Rotskoff specializes in nasal allergies, immunotherapy, asthma, as well as sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. “Sleep apnea is a breathing issue, first and foremost,” explains Dr. Rotskoff. “It is often characterized by snoring and restless sleep patterns, but what really happens during sleep apnea is breathing resistance or pauses in breathing. That resistance shouldn’t be ignored.” Dr. Rotskoff provides comprehensive screening for children and adults with OSA in Chicago, nocturnal sleep studies, and treatment using the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Deprived Pilots Plunged in to Atlantic

air france flight crash 2009On a storm-hit night in the month of June 2009 an Air France flight 447 plunged into the Atlantic Ocean and 228 lives were lost when the Airbus was on its regular overnight flight from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.

The flight data recorder reveals that the pilots were all dangerously sleep deprived. Captain of the flight could get barely one hour’s sleep the night before.

A new report obtained by the French news magazine Le Point reveals that the 58-year-old captain, Marc Debois, can be heard on a black box recording saying, “I didn’t sleep enough last night. Read the rest of this entry

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