Among patients who were identified as likely having moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, treatment based in primary care was not clinically inferior to treatment at a specialist sleep center for improvement in daytime sleepiness scores, according to a study appearing in the March 13 issue of JAMA.

“Obstructive sleep apnea with accompanying daytime sleepiness was estimated during the early 1990s to affect between 2 percent and 4 percent of middle-aged adults. With growing awareness of the public health implications of untreated disease and rising obesity rates that have increased the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, there has been a steady demand for sleep service provision in specialist centers and growing waiting lists for sleep physician consultation and laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG),” according to background information in the article. Read the rest of this entry

Glucose-Tolerance-Test-During-PregnancyResearchers have attempted exploring the relationships among sleep disturbances, glucose tolerance, and pregnancy outcomes.

Four validated sleep questionnaires were administered to 169 pregnant women at the time of 50-g oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) during the second trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 108 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT).

Almost 41% of the participants had excessive daytime sleepiness ; 64% had poor sleep quality; 25% snored frequently; 29% had increased risk of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB); 52% experienced short sleep (SS); 19% had both increased SDB risk and Short sleep; and 14% had daytime dysfunction. Read the rest of this entry

Obstructive Sleep Apnea:New Research Explorations

OSA1An important new finding has come from an observational study linking obstructive sleep apnea with cancer mortality. Based on 22 years of follow-up data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort, investigators reported that mortality was higher for people with mild obstructive sleep apnea , moderate obstructive sleep apnea , and severe obstructive sleep apnea .

Cancer mortality in this context refers to all types of cancer, with lung cancer the most frequent. The researchers cited preclinical studies showing that chronic or intermittent hypoxia—the latter mimicking clinical obstructive sleep apnea—can lead to tumor growth and resistance to radiotherapy. This new research provides a possible mechanistic link between obesity and cancer, and will help to increase awareness of obstructive sleep apnea by broadening its potential detrimental outcomes beyond the cardiovascular system. Whether the purported effects of obstructive sleep apnea on cancer mortality will be reported in other cohorts or can be mitigated by intervention is unclear. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep disordered breathingA research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting mal-adaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

Various Types of Sleep Related Disorders

Sometimes lack of sleep is caused by disorders that can also cause problems during the day. Examples include:

sleep related disorderNight sweats, which are caused by menopause, cancer, and infections.

Hypersomnia, which is excessive day time sleepiness caused by narcolepsy, being overweight, use of certain medicines, or drug and alcohol use.

Kleine Leven syndrome, where sufferers sleep up to 20 hours a day for several weeks.

Insomnia, which affects 30 to 50% of the population.

Narcolepsy, where sufferers may fall asleep easily during the day.

Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, where limbs move rhythmically during sleep.

Six percent of Americans suffer from sleep apnea, a condition where the sufferer stops breathing for 10 to 30 seconds, up to 400 times a night. Two to four percent of the American population suffers from apnea without a diagnosis. Sleep Apnea sufferers are six times more likely to die in a traffic accident due to fatigue. People who sleep next to apnea sufferers lose an average of one hour of sleep per night, and people with untreated apnea are four times more likely to suffer a stroke. Half of those with sleep apnea snore heavily.

man-snoringSleepApneaDisorder/[Press Release] /WASHINGTON, DC/December 22, 2012 / The most common symptom of sleep apnea is loud snoring. Sleep apnea is caused by an obstruction of your airways. When you are in a prone position, your airways naturally constrict to some degree. If you have sleep apnea, this constriction will be more exaggerated, resulting in loud, labored breathing.

Other symptoms of sleep apnea include: Daytime sleepiness, Frequent headaches, Waking up and not feeling refreshed, Night sweats

Some symptoms of sleep apnea may only be noticed by a loved one or roommate. These include: Nighttime choking, Gasping for air during sleep, Frequent periods of breathlessness during sleep, Restlessness or tossing and turning in your sleep.If your loved one brings any of these symptoms to your attention, it is important to see a dentist for a sleep apnea evaluation. Read the rest of this entry

female with sleep apneaFemales with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) show different psychological and physiological symptoms from males, which may be associated with sex-related variations in neural injury occurring with the disorder. To determine whether male- or female-specific brain injury is present in OSA, we assessed influences of sex on white matter changes in the condition.

80 subjects total, with newly diagnosed, untreated OSA groups of 10 female (age mean ± SE: 52.6 ± 2.4 years, AHI 22.5 ± 4.1 events/h) and 20 male (age 48.9 ± 1.7, AHI 25.5 ± 2.9) patients, and 20 female (age 50.3 ± 1.7) and 30 male (age 49.2 ± 1.4) healthy control subjects. Read the rest of this entry

Almost 7% of the Malaysian adult population is suffering from obstructive sleep apnea(OSA), a deadly sleep disorder that severely affects the breathing process.

The Philips Health and Wellbeing Index is a comprehensive analysis of responses from over 31,000 people (from 47 countries, including Malaysia) on their health and wellbeing. This specific sleep study concluded in the year 2010 and the findings were released at the end of 2011.

“Most common cause of all sleep-related disorders was obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). People who have this disorder stop breathing repeatedly while sleeping”, says Philips Malaysia managing director Naeem Shahab Khan. . Read the rest of this entry

Philips Respironics Improves CPAP Machines

Building on their highly successful System One humidification, Philips  Respironics has introduced an additional humidification solution that enhances  performance, flexibility and comfort for the sleep apnea sufferer. The System  One Heated Tube provides CPAP users with air temperature control, improved humidification and rainout  protection. The Heated Tube can only be found on the Philips Respironics System  One REMstar Auto A-Flex with Heated Humidification and Heated Tube model  DS560TS.

The System One Heated Tube takes into account the room temperature and  humidity by using a sensor at the end of the Heated Tube to allow the CPAP user to choose what temperature is  right for them and at the same time protects against rainout. The Heated  Tube is a welcome advance in CPAP therapy and is just another reason why Philips  Respironics is a leader in the sleep therapy market. Read the rest of this entry

A recently concluded research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting maladaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

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