Sleep Apnea and Associated Health Problems

health problemsMajority of the people around the world living with sleep apnea may not realize their breathing is being interrupted while they sleep. Often family members might notice the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea first. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase the risk of developing other life-threatening heath conditions such as hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

When someone has sleep apnea, their breathing stops or becomes shallow while sleeping. In adults, apnea is considered significant when these pauses in breathing last 10 seconds or longer and occur more than five to 15 or more times an hour.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type and is caused by the inability to move enough air through the mouth and nose into the lungs because of complete or partial blockage in the upper airways during sleep. When breathing resumes, it often is accompanied by a gasp, snort, body jerk or an arousal. Read the rest of this entry

strokeAccording to the findings of a recently concluded research study the atrial fibrillation (AF) may play an intermediary role in the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stroke, research findings suggest.

Resaerchers at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, USA observed that  patients with OSA who had a stroke had significantly higher rates of atrial fibrillation, even after accounting for potential confounders, than their peers without stroke.

“This could potentially indicate that patients with OSA and AF need aggressive treatment to mitigate the risk of future stroke,” the researchers say, although they caution that as theirs was a case-control study, a causal relationship between AF and stroke could not be established. Read the rest of this entry

childhood-obesityObesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s triple the rate from just one generation ago.

A New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study found 40 percent of Vineland children between ages 6 and 11 are overweight, compared to 21 percent nationally.

Almost 90 percent of children aren’t eating enough vegetables. Majority of the children aren’t physically active for at least 60 minutes a day. This unhealthy reality has long-term consequences, too.

As weight increases so do the risks for coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon), hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea and respiratory problems and gynecological problems. Read the rest of this entry

breathing excercisesYoga Breathing

According to Dr. Paulose, a plastic and laser surgeon, yoga does not cure sleep apnea, but it can help reduce symptoms. He suggests the ujjayi pranayama, or hissing breath, to increase lung capacity and remove throat blockages. Sit in a lotus position, breathe deeply through your nostrils until calm, then inhale forcefully through the nostrils while contracting your neck muscles to produce a low, throbbing sound. Hold this inhaled breath as long as possible, then close one nostril with your fingers and slowly exhale through the other nostril. Repeat with the other nostril and perform three to five times each day. Read the rest of this entry

central sleep apneaAlong with obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea is one of the two main forms of sleep apnea, a dangerous class of sleep disorders characterized by an interruption of breathing of 10 seconds or more numerous times an hour during sleep.

Dangers of Central Sleep Apnea 

Although central sleep apnea is less common than obstructive sleep apnea, it is just as dangerous.

Central sleep apnea can result in severe morning headaches, daytime fatigue, anxiety, depression, short-term memory problems and difficulty focusing.  Read the rest of this entry

sleep studyIt is not just the amount of sleep that is important for good health, but the right type of sleep is also needed for an individual to prevent some of these more serious health problems,

Slow brain wave sleep allows the body to restore at the cellular level. Without this cellular repair, the risk of disease increases for obesity, diabetes, depression and hypertension.

The measurement of these brain waves, heart rates, oxygen levels and other body functions during sleep can only be diagnosed through a medical sleep study. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea1 Sleep apnea is a common and potentially deadly sleep disorder in which your breathing may stop for 10 seconds or more multiple times per hour.

Types of Sleep Apnea

There are two primary forms of sleep apnea:
– Obstructive sleep apnea
– Central sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is the result of an airway obstruction that is typically caused by overly relaxed muscles in the throat. When these muscles relax, tissue in the throat can collapse, narrowing the airway and preventing adequate oxygen intake. Read the rest of this entry

sunita williams actiwatchTo develop measures to improve the quality and duration of sleep in space, scientists are conducting the Sleep — Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight — Long investigation or Sleep-Long. This study examines the sleep — wake patterns of the crew members while they are aboard the space station.

The quality and duration of slumber impact human health, attitude, and ability to focus. The Institute of Medicine released a report in 2006 stating that chronic sleep loss could lead to hypertension, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke and multiple psychiatric disorders. Crew members spend years training for missions on strenuous schedules and then, when they finally reach the space station, their coordinated timetable does not allow for hitting the snooze button.

The Sleep — Long investigation uses an objective approach to monitoring sleep by having the crew wear an Actiwatch. This device, which resembles a wristwatch, monitors sleep/wake activity using a miniature accelerometer that records crew movement. The Actiwatch also measures the ambient light conditions during the study. There is a subjective element to the investigation, as well, in which the crew maintains a daily sleep log for the duration of one week, every third week while aboard the space station.

Scientists compare sleep-wake activity and light exposure patterns from the data obtained in orbit with the baseline data collected on Earth. Results from the investigation may lead to changes in lighting requirements, sleep shifting schedules and workload plans for future space station occupants.

The study may also help to indicate when additional measures are needed to minimize the risks of sleep deprivation in orbit. Findings from the study will not only benefit the crew of the space station for the immediate future, but also have important implications for future long-duration exploration. Such findings may also provide improved sleep aids for those suffering from insomnia here on Earth, as well as benefit shift workers, such as hospital, law enforcement, and military staff.

Read Complete Article By by Jessica NimonNASA’s Johnson Space Center

50% Women Have Risk of Mild-to-Severe Sleep Apnea

A recently concluded Swedish research study established that 50 % of the women who underwent the overnight sleep study turned out to have mild-to-severe sleep apnea.

The random population sample constituting 400 women were monitored while sleeping. Almost 50% of these women experienced at least five episodes an hour when they stopped breathing for longer than 10 seconds, the minimum definition of sleep apnea.

Among the obese and women with hypertension the risk factors for sleep apnea was recorded as high as 80 to 84 percent of occurrence.

Dr. Karl Franklin, the lead author of the study and a professor at Umea University in Sweden says,’ How important the mild sleep apnea is, we don’t know”. The study also recorded high occurrence of mild sleep apnea among the womenRead the rest of this entry

Economic Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

NovaSom, Inc., the leader in home sleep testing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) management, announces it has collaborated with Jefferson School of Population Health to convene the first expert advisory board exploring the impact of undiagnosed OSA on healthcare costs and productivity in the workplace. The unique event brought together top industry thought leaders to discuss new avenues for employers to administer OSA screening, diagnosis and treatment for employees in an effort to manage the growing OSA epidemic within their organization. It took place in Washington, DC on March 9, 2012. Read the rest of this entry

Related Posts with Thumbnails