Sleep Disorders Open House At Devenport

devenport sleep centerThe Genesis Sleep Disorders Center will host an open house from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, March 10, at its Genesis Medical Center, West Central Park location, 1401 W. Central Park, Davenport.

Staff from Genesis Home Medical Equipment will be available to show new CPAP equipment used to treat sleep apnea. Board-certified sleep specialists will be available to answer sleep questions.

The Genesis Sleep Disorders Center offers treatment for excessive daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy, apnea, insomnia, sleepwalking and childhood sleep problems with the help of board-certified sleep physicians and registered sleep technologists. Genesis sleep programs are located in Davenport, DeWitt, Silvis, Maquoketa, and Aledo.

For information, call (563) 421-1525, or go to www.genesishealth.com/sleep.To see a board-certified sleep specialist at the Genesis Sleep Clinic, call centralized scheduling at (563) 421-3200, or toll-free at (866) 829-8108.

sleep studyIt is not just the amount of sleep that is important for good health, but the right type of sleep is also needed for an individual to prevent some of these more serious health problems,

Slow brain wave sleep allows the body to restore at the cellular level. Without this cellular repair, the risk of disease increases for obesity, diabetes, depression and hypertension.

The measurement of these brain waves, heart rates, oxygen levels and other body functions during sleep can only be diagnosed through a medical sleep study. Read the rest of this entry

Lack of Good Sleep Causes Many Health Impacts

lack of good sleepGood sleep is fundamental to good health. Good sleep helps you think , look, function, and perform  better.

Proper sleep is as essential as the balanced diet and healthy exercise. It helps you reduce fatigue and irritability. Good sleep enhances capacity to react faster and increase concentration ability.

For an adult seven to nine hours of sleep is needed. However, the choice of round-the-clock activity has become overwhelming. As a result millions across the world face acute lack of sleep.

According to the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM), sleep problems add up to a global epidemic that affects 45 percent of the world’s population. The statistic and demographic clearinghouse, “Statistic Brain,” verifies this staggering statistic and asserts that approximately 40 million Americans suffer from a chronic sleep disorder, such as insomnia, sleep apnea or narcolepsy (a brain’s inability to regulate sleep/wake cycles normally). Read the rest of this entry

Various Types of Sleep Related Disorders

Sometimes lack of sleep is caused by disorders that can also cause problems during the day. Examples include:

sleep related disorderNight sweats, which are caused by menopause, cancer, and infections.

Hypersomnia, which is excessive day time sleepiness caused by narcolepsy, being overweight, use of certain medicines, or drug and alcohol use.

Kleine Leven syndrome, where sufferers sleep up to 20 hours a day for several weeks.

Insomnia, which affects 30 to 50% of the population.

Narcolepsy, where sufferers may fall asleep easily during the day.

Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, where limbs move rhythmically during sleep.

Six percent of Americans suffer from sleep apnea, a condition where the sufferer stops breathing for 10 to 30 seconds, up to 400 times a night. Two to four percent of the American population suffers from apnea without a diagnosis. Sleep Apnea sufferers are six times more likely to die in a traffic accident due to fatigue. People who sleep next to apnea sufferers lose an average of one hour of sleep per night, and people with untreated apnea are four times more likely to suffer a stroke. Half of those with sleep apnea snore heavily.

Sleep affects a person’s waking hours more than a person realizes. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, about 60 million Americans suffer from insomnia or other sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, restless limb syndrome, narcolepsy, delayed or advanced sleep phase syndrome and parasomnias. 

The Alert, Well and Keeping Energy (AWAKE) sleep support group is part of the Piedmont Newnan Sleep Center’s efforts to help patients get the rest they need to lead normal, productive lives.

“People don’t realize the affect and power a good night’s sleep has on people,” says Jennifer Morrow, the Piedmont Newnan Hospital Sleep Center and AWAKE support group coordinator.

Some common symptoms of not getting enough rest include excessive sleepiness during daytime hours, loud snoring, pauses during breathing while asleep, morning headaches, restless legs during sleep and exhaustion despite having enough sleep hours. Read the rest of this entry

A new study presented in November at the American College of Allergy, Asthma  and Immunology Annual Meeting found that obese adolescents have an increased risk of sleep apnea or abnormal breathing during sleep.

Previous research has shown that obese children and teenagers are at higher  risk of health-related problems, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood  pressure and asthma. Children who are overweight are nearly 2-1/2 times more  likely to have asthma than those who are not overweight. Now, this new study  highlights how obesity may interfere with a child’s ability to have restful  sleep.

“Quality nighttime sleep is a key component for advanced executive function  in children and teenagers,” says Sushmita Mikkilineni, M.D., Director Pediatric  Pulmonology for Children’s Hospital of New Jersey (CHoNJ) at Newark Beth Israel  Medical Center. “Untreated pediatric sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, can  exact a heavy toll on young people. Children suffering from sleep disorders may  be hyperactive, inattentive, and chronically tired.” Read the rest of this entry

The diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders have come a long way in recent years. In the past, people who snored might be advised to sew a tennis ball onto the back of their pajama top. The “snore ball” would discourage them from sleeping on their back and might quiet their droning. Or a doctor might use the “dog index” to measure poor sleep: If your dog generally sleeps with you but by morning has left the bed more than half the time, it may be because you’re such a loud, restless sleeper that the dog has gone elsewhere for some peace and quiet.

How things have changed. Now, doctors with special training diagnose and treat more than 80 sleep disorders – from obstructive sleep apnea to narcolepsy – at special centers with labs where a patient’s every sleeping moment may be recorded and measured. Read the rest of this entry

Jeannine Gingras, M.D., a nationally and internationally recognized expert in sleep disorders, has opened Gingras Sleep Medicine in Charlotte and Concord, North Carolina.

Dr. Gingras treats infants, children, teens and adults and practices sleep medicine exclusively. She sees patients for all sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, insomnia, snoring, sleepwalking, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, narcolepsy, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Read the rest of this entry

Insomnia, one of the most dreaded – yet highly common – is affecting more than 30% of the world’s population. Not surprisingly, people today have been found to experience 20% less of the good night’s sleep that people from 100 years ago tremendously enjoyed. Often caused by stress and anxiety or involving genetics, insomnia is prompting roughly 10 million Americans to pop prescription medicine to help them fall into a deep slumber.

As the number of “insomniacs” around the world soars, so does the need for trusted, relevant data on how alleviate the condition.

Established in 2005, Help-Me-To-Sleep.com aims to provide a wealth of facts and advice on a range of sleep disorders including insomnia, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, restless leg syndrome and shift work sleep disorder. The website contains insomnia definition to help visitors understand the condition, while tackling in detail what causes insomnia and how to treat it. Read the rest of this entry

The Hospital of Central Connecticut’s Sleep Disorders Center is set to host an open house at its satellite location in Southington on Thursday. The sleep disorder center diagnoses, evaluates and treats a plethora of sleep disorders like sleep apnea and narcolepsy.

The new satellite center is a four-bed center with the capacity to expand to six beds.Each of the rooms includes a full-sized bed, TV, recliner and full bathroom. After opening, the sleep center will seek accreditation from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

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