napA short nap can help relieve stress and bolster the immune systems of men who slept only two hours the previous night, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Lack of sleep is recognized as a public health problem. Insufficient sleep can contribute to reduced productivity as well as vehicle and industrial accidents, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, people who sleep too little are more likely to develop chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression.

Nearly three in 10 adults reported they slept an average of six hours or less a night, according to the National Health Interview Survey.

“Our data suggests a 30-minute nap can reverse the hormonal impact of a night of poor sleep,” said one of the JCEM study’s authors, Brice Faraut, PhD, of the Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité in Paris, France. “This is the first study that found napping could restore biomarkers of neuroendocrine and immune health to normal levels.” Read the rest of this entry

Low Energy Diet Improves Sleep Apnea

low energy dietObese men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who followed a very low energy diet may maintain their initial improvements one year later.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, assessed whether early improvements in obstructive sleep apnea after a very low energy diet were maintained one year later in 63 men, aged 30 to 65 years, with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m². Participants were treated with continuous positive airway pressure and underwent a one-year weight loss program consisting of nine weeks of a very low energy diet followed by a weight loss maintenance program, which was completed by 44 men. The severity of sleep apnea was measured using the apnea hypopnea index. Read the rest of this entry

Among patients who were identified as likely having moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, treatment based in primary care was not clinically inferior to treatment at a specialist sleep center for improvement in daytime sleepiness scores, according to a study appearing in the March 13 issue of JAMA.

“Obstructive sleep apnea with accompanying daytime sleepiness was estimated during the early 1990s to affect between 2 percent and 4 percent of middle-aged adults. With growing awareness of the public health implications of untreated disease and rising obesity rates that have increased the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, there has been a steady demand for sleep service provision in specialist centers and growing waiting lists for sleep physician consultation and laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG),” according to background information in the article. Read the rest of this entry

Insufficient Sleep Causes Obesity

insufficient sleepA recently concluded research revealed that sufficient sleep is critical for controlling obesity. The research participants who slept just five hours a night over a workweek gained nearly two pounds of weight. Findings of this research study have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“I don’t think extra sleep by itself is going to lead to weight loss,” said Kenneth Wright, director of University of Colorado-Boulder’s Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, which led the study. Read the rest of this entry

Snoring Children May Have Sleep Apnea Too

snoring in childrenSnoring is very common among the children. Nearly 10 per cent children snore most nights. Snoring is a noise that occurs during sleep when the child is breathing in and there is some blockage of air passing through the back of the mouth.

The opening and closing of the air passage causes a vibration of the tissues in the throat. The loudness is affected by how much air is passing through and how fast the throat tissue is vibrating.

Children aged three years or older tend to snore during the deeper stages of sleep. Primary snoring is defined as snoring that is not associated with more serious problems such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), frequent arousals from sleep, or inability of the lungs to breathe in sufficient oxygen. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea disorderSleep apnea is a common disorder in which a person experiences one or more breathing pauses or shallow breaths while sleeping. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea, in which the airway collapses or becomes blocked. It can range from mild to severe.

Sleep Apnea Symptoms: Snoring, daytime sleepiness, morning headaches, memory or learning problems or not being able to concentrate, feeling irritable or depressed, waking up frequently to urinate, dry mouth or sore throat upon waking.

Sleep Apnea Dangers: Untreated sleep apnea can increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, obesity and diabetes; worsen heart failure; make irregular heartbeats more likely; and increase the chance of having work-related or driving accidents. Read the rest of this entry

childhood-obesityObesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s triple the rate from just one generation ago.

A New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study found 40 percent of Vineland children between ages 6 and 11 are overweight, compared to 21 percent nationally.

Almost 90 percent of children aren’t eating enough vegetables. Majority of the children aren’t physically active for at least 60 minutes a day. This unhealthy reality has long-term consequences, too.

As weight increases so do the risks for coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon), hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea and respiratory problems and gynecological problems. Read the rest of this entry

Obstructive Sleep Apnea:New Research Explorations

OSA1An important new finding has come from an observational study linking obstructive sleep apnea with cancer mortality. Based on 22 years of follow-up data from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort, investigators reported that mortality was higher for people with mild obstructive sleep apnea , moderate obstructive sleep apnea , and severe obstructive sleep apnea .

Cancer mortality in this context refers to all types of cancer, with lung cancer the most frequent. The researchers cited preclinical studies showing that chronic or intermittent hypoxia—the latter mimicking clinical obstructive sleep apnea—can lead to tumor growth and resistance to radiotherapy. This new research provides a possible mechanistic link between obesity and cancer, and will help to increase awareness of obstructive sleep apnea by broadening its potential detrimental outcomes beyond the cardiovascular system. Whether the purported effects of obstructive sleep apnea on cancer mortality will be reported in other cohorts or can be mitigated by intervention is unclear. Read the rest of this entry

cpapContinuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) effectively decreases the risk of cardiovascular death in elderly patients who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA),

Findings of a research study conducted in Spain attempted assessment OSA and the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in cardiovascular mortality in the elderly and revealed that the younger patients, elderly patients with severe, untreated sleep apnea have a higher cardiovascular mortality than those with mild to moderate disease or those without sleep apnea.

The research also revealed that treatment with CPAP can reduce cardiovascular mortality in elderly OSA patients to levels similar to those found in patients without disease or with mild to moderate sleep apnea. Read the rest of this entry

Breathing Disorders Linked with Insomnia

 Insomnia is a sleep disorder that compels the sufferer to stay awake or reduces the capacity to fall asleep.Insomnia is also a transient condition due to emotional stress, anxiety or a response to certain medications or medical conditions.

Insomnia occurrence without any known medical reason is termed as primary insomnia. Chronic insomnia is diagnosed if the condition lasts for longer than a month.

insomniaInsomnia has significant physiological and psychological consequences. Restorative sleep is as important to our well-being as healthy food and regular exercise.

Insomnia diminishes quality of life up to large extent. If unresolved, chronic insomnia causes slowed reactions, mental health issues such as depression or anxiety, physical ailments such as obesity and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases as well as lower performance at work or at school. Read the rest of this entry

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