overweight pilotsFAA has now revised its policy for pilots who now will be allowed to keep flying while being evaluated for the sleep apnea disorder.Facing a backlash from pilots and aviation lobbying groups, the FAA has reversed course on a controversial medical policy that would have grounded overweight pilots until they underwent screening for obstructive sleep apnea.
The FAA’s new medical screening guidance follows more than a year of lobbying efforts on behalf of several aviation organizations, including AOPA, the National Business Aviation Association and the Experimental Aircraft Association. As first revealed by the agency late in 2013, the FAA’s chief federal air surgeon sought to require that any pilot with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater, and a neck size of 17 inches or greater, undergo obstructive sleep apnea screening prior to receiving a medical certificate.
The new policy, which takes effect March 2, will require overweight pilots who are diagnosed with OSA to receive treatment to continue flying.
AOPA President Mark Baker and NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen both applauded the policy change, calling the revised guidelines a “common-sense approach” to medical certification.

sleepImageAcross the globe more than a million exhausted people with sleep apnea—a sleep and breathing disorder caused when throat muscles relax and block the airway during sleep—get into car accidents, causing over a thousand deaths every year.

 Apnea is linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, an additional $3.4 billion in medical costs, and $16 billion in auto collision costs. Even though apnea has telltale signs (loud snoring, daytime fatigue), it remains totally undiagnosed in almost 75 percent of the people.

Polysomnography, the only diagnostic sleep study for sleep apnea is not cheap generally. the standard medical sleep study, requires a medical technician to attach 22 wires to a person’s body and monitor them all night long. The average cost is nearly $3,000. This is quite an out of the pocket expense for anyone. Follow-up tests are even more cost bearing and burdensome. The idea of doing clinical sleep studies once a month to monitor progress is a diagnostic crack-pipe fantasy. Read the rest of this entry

Ibuprofen Safer Than Morphine After Sleep Apnea Surgery

Ibuprofen in TonsillectomyFindings of a recently concluded research study (Motherisk Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and by McMaster University and McMaster Children’s Hospital ) revealed that treating postoperative pain with morphine subsequent to the tonsillectomy surgery which is commonly and effectively used to treat childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children.

This study identified a significant risk for potentially fatal breathing disruption when morphine is administered at home after surgery to treat pain in children who undergo tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy. Prescribing Ibuprofen instead, after Pediatric Sleep Apnea Surgery would be a better option.

The detailed findings of this research study as published in the January 26 online edition of Pediatrics  also established that ibuprofen is a safe and effective alternative. Read the rest of this entry

gestational diabetesWomen who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes bear seven times probability of suffering with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)  compared to the other pregnant women. A most recent research study concluded and due to be published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) revealed

Pregnancy is associated with sleep disturbances. Sleep is more disturbed in GDM than in P-NGT women. There is a strong association between GDM and OSA.

Prime objective of the research study was to assess the relationship between pregnancy, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) , and GDM.

“It is common for pregnant women to experience sleep disruptions, but the risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea increases substantially in women who have gestational diabetes,” said Sirimon Reutrakul, MD, who conducted the research at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Nearly 75 percent of the participants in our study who had gestational diabetes also suffered from obstructive sleep apnea.”  Read the rest of this entry

women with sleep apneaSleep Apnea has long been thought to be a condition only experienced by middle-aged overweight men. The stereotypical snoring man who gasps for breath while sleeping and sometimes stops breathing altogether should no longer be the norm. Women make up a third of the total diagnosed population with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and manufacturers, sleep clinics, and retailers are starting to notice. New products have come to market in the last few months aimed solely at women patients.

Thirty-three percent of new patients who underwent a sleep study that resulted in OSA were women. It’s not surprising, of course, that women should suffer the same pains as men when it comes to sleep. However, diagnosis in women is usually harder to come by and sometimes overlooked. Why? There are a few reasons. First is the stereotype. Doctors too are often mislead by the stereotype and will not consider OSA as a possible reason for a woman’s tiredness or reduction in quality of life. Second, women tend to snore less often than men. Read the rest of this entry

78% People Unaware That They Have Sleep Apnea

sleep awarenessPhilips Electronics has announced the results of an extensive new scientific study into sleep apnea, conducted over the last two years by Philips in collaboration with University of Twente (Enschede, the Netherlands), Medisch Spectrum Twente Hospital (Enschede, the Netherlands), and patients’ organization ApneuVereniging.

The study, which surveyed 4,206 Philips employees in the Netherlands, revealed that 6.4% of them suffered from sleep apnea. A striking finding was that 78% of the people surveyed who reported symptoms of sleep apnea were entirely unaware that they were suffering from this sleep disorder.

Despite that fact that many people are unaware that they suffer from sleep apnea, the condition can have serious consequences for their health. It is also not difficult to treat. The aim of the study was therefore to gather up-to-date scientific information about how often sleep apnea, the commonest form of which is Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) caused by obstruction of the upper airway, occurs. Read the rest of this entry

sleepingSleep apnea have been estimated to affect adversely more than six percent of the working population across the globe. Ironically almost 80 percent of these people don’t even know that they are suffering from such a deadly sleep disorder.

A recently concluded research study involving  more than 4200 workers at Philips Electronics in the Netherlands revealed startling finding. Philips and a research team from the Netherlands University of Twente worked together to identify just how often workers are victimized by the commonest form of sleep apnea, an intermittent blockage in the upper airways while sleeping that’s called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS).

According to the US National Institutes of Health the surprisingly serious condition often slips by without being diagnosed because, you are sleeping. However, if you live with anybody else, you should pay attention if they complain that you snore. When you try to breathe through the blockage, it can cause extremely loud and disruptive snoring as your body struggles to catch its breath. And that’s the first sign of a problem. Read the rest of this entry

sleep apnea2According to an estimate almost two-thirds of people with a potentially deadly sleep disorder have not been diagnosed – and are therefore not getting treatment.

Undiagnosed sleep apnea or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to health problems such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Sleep disorders, including OSA and sleep deprivation, are a global epidemic, affecting almost 45 per cent of the world’s population.

Commemorating the World Sleep Day 2013, Philips Resprionics is raising the stakes on OSA and pledging to test one million at-risk people over the next five years.

Philips is a leader in sleep health and committed making a good night’s sleep a healthy priority through the development of OSA treatment solutions that offer freedom and independence for millions of people suffering from chronic conditions.

It is now time to know that if you may be suffering from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), take this Sleep Quiz .

Snoring Children May Have Sleep Apnea Too

snoring in childrenSnoring is very common among the children. Nearly 10 per cent children snore most nights. Snoring is a noise that occurs during sleep when the child is breathing in and there is some blockage of air passing through the back of the mouth.

The opening and closing of the air passage causes a vibration of the tissues in the throat. The loudness is affected by how much air is passing through and how fast the throat tissue is vibrating.

Children aged three years or older tend to snore during the deeper stages of sleep. Primary snoring is defined as snoring that is not associated with more serious problems such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), frequent arousals from sleep, or inability of the lungs to breathe in sufficient oxygen. Read the rest of this entry

pregnant womenWomen with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers have recommended use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing, during sleep. These pauses can last from at least ten seconds to minutes, and may occur five to 30 times or more an hour; this can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers conducted an observational study with an objective to measure the incidence of OSA among pregnant and reproductive women.  Read the rest of this entry

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