children with sleep apneaA recently concluded research study has revealed that obstructive sleep apnea, a common form of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), is associated with increased rates of ADHD-like behavioral problems in children as well as other adaptive and learning problems.

“This study provides some helpful information for medical professionals consulting with parents about treatment options for children with SDB that, although it may remit, there are considerable behavioral risks associated with continued SDB,” said Michelle Perfect, PhD, the study’s lead author and assistant professor in the school psychology program in the department of disability and psychoeducational studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  Read the rest of this entry

Glucose-Tolerance-Test-During-PregnancyResearchers have attempted exploring the relationships among sleep disturbances, glucose tolerance, and pregnancy outcomes.

Four validated sleep questionnaires were administered to 169 pregnant women at the time of 50-g oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) during the second trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 108 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT).

Almost 41% of the participants had excessive daytime sleepiness ; 64% had poor sleep quality; 25% snored frequently; 29% had increased risk of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB); 52% experienced short sleep (SS); 19% had both increased SDB risk and Short sleep; and 14% had daytime dysfunction. Read the rest of this entry

children with sleep disordered breathingA research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting mal-adaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

sleep disordered breathing and snoring in childrenSleep disturbances are nowadays a public health concern throughout the world. They affect millions of people, and their prevalence is increasing not only in adults but also in children. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is one of the most common sleep disturbances; it represents a continuum of symptoms from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). While the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in adults is 2–10 %, the prevalence of snoring is much higher. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among children and adolescents has been reported to range between 1 and 3 % and that of snoring between 7 and 25 %.

It is alarming that overweight and obesity are becoming more common in children and adolescents in many developed countries. A recent report revealed that 10 % of children and 26 % of adolescents are overweight in Finland. Excess body fat is a well-recognized risk factor for Sleep-disordered breathing in adults, but it has also been proposed to be an important risk factor for paediatric Sleep-disordered breathing . In children, traditional risk factors for Sleep-disordered breathing include adenotonsillar hypertrophy, deviations in craniofacial morphology and dental occlusion. Thus, the pathogenesis of Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children seems to be complex and multifactorial.  Read the rest of this entry

Children with Prader-Willi syndrome are likely to get relief from sleep disorders after undergoing an adenotonsillectomy.

A recently concluded research study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital published in the November print issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery revealed the outcome.

“Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome are at risk for sleep disordered breathing as growth hormone commonly used to treat their condition can cause the tonsils and adenoids to enlarge,” said the study’s lead author Kris Jatana, MD, FAAP, with Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery at Nationwide Children’s. Read the rest of this entry

A recently concluded research study findings are important for parents who often think that snoring babies are deeply sleeping ones. This research however revealed that snoring, along with mouth-breathing and sleep apnea, are sure symptoms of disordered sleep and the chances of developing long-term problems in children’s behavior and emotional well-being are quite high.

Findings of this research study have been published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers say that babies who have these sleep problems at 6 months may be anywhere from 20% to 100% more likely to have problem behaviors such as hyperactivity by age 7.

The study was conducted with more  than 11,000 children followed for over six years at the at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the researchers found that young children with sleep-disordered breathing are prone to developing behavioral difficulties such as hyperactivity and aggressiveness, as well as emotional symptoms and difficulty with peer relationships. Read the rest of this entry

A recently concluded research study established that the children who experience sleep-disordered breathing are significantly more probably exhibiting maladaptive behaviors subsequent to surgery compared to those children who do not have any respiratory problem.

Researchers from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor were intrigued by the postoperative behavioral problems—like fussiness, disobedience and introversion, and daytime sleepiness.

“All of us have taken care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)patients at one time or another,” said Robert E. Christensen, MD, clinical lecturer in anesthesiology at the institution. Read the rest of this entry

People with obstructive sleep apnea are more likely to stick to prescribed treatment when a partner or parent is involved with their treatment, according to a team of sleep researchers.

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep. It is the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, and chances of it occurring become more elevated in obese people.

The first line of treatment for sleep apnea is a non-invasive in-home treatment called CPAP, continuous positive airway pressure therapy. However, if patients do not use the equipment properly, or at all, it cannot help. Read the rest of this entry

University of Chicago scientists have dovered important new relationships between obesity, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and cognitive processing among elementary school children.

“The intricate interdependencies between BMI, SDB and cognition shown in our study are of particular importance in children, as their brains are still rapidly developing,” says study author Karen Spruyt, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Pritzer School of Medicine. “Rising rates of obesity in children may amplify these relationships. Public health campaigns targeting obesity should emphasize not only the health benefits but the potential educational benefits of losing weight.”

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Read the rest of this entry

SleepApneaDisorder/ [  Press Release  ]/ Versailles, Ohio /October 17, 2011/ Sleep Apnea: A Growing Health Concern According to the National Institute  of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, an estimated 18 million Americans have  sleep apnea. However, few of them have had the problem diagnosed.

Sleep apnea is the repeated interruption of normal breathing during sleep.  Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type of breathing-related sleep disorder. In patients with OSA, the airway collapses, temporarily restricting  airflow to the lungs. This partial airway obstruction causes the upper airway  tissue to vibrate and produce the sound of the classic snore.

As OSA develops, it has a cumulative effect, meaning that the longer the  disease goes untreated, the greater the negative side effects and associated  health risks. According to numerous  research studies, if sleep apnea remains untreated, other health conditions  may emerge or current health problems may worsen, including: Read the rest of this entry

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