Homeschooled Teens Get Healthier Sleep

teenagers sleep problemsA recently concluded research study revealed that the teenagers who are homeschooled benefit from healthier sleep habits than those who go to most private and public schools.

The findings provide additional evidence of teens’ altered biological clocks and support an argument for starting traditional high school later in the morning.

“We have a school system that is set up so that the youngest children, who are awake very early in the morning, start school latest, and our adolescents, who need sleep the most, are being asked to wake up and go to school at a time when their brains should physiologically be asleep,” said Lisa Meltzer, PhD, a sleep psychologist at National Jewish Health in Denver, and lead author of the study. Read the rest of this entry

sleepingSleep apnea have been estimated to affect adversely more than six percent of the working population across the globe. Ironically almost 80 percent of these people don’t even know that they are suffering from such a deadly sleep disorder.

A recently concluded research study involving  more than 4200 workers at Philips Electronics in the Netherlands revealed startling finding. Philips and a research team from the Netherlands University of Twente worked together to identify just how often workers are victimized by the commonest form of sleep apnea, an intermittent blockage in the upper airways while sleeping that’s called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS).

According to the US National Institutes of Health the surprisingly serious condition often slips by without being diagnosed because, you are sleeping. However, if you live with anybody else, you should pay attention if they complain that you snore. When you try to breathe through the blockage, it can cause extremely loud and disruptive snoring as your body struggles to catch its breath. And that’s the first sign of a problem. Read the rest of this entry

Sleep Loss Among Teenage Students

teenage sleep lossDespite sleep deprivation being a problem, people don’t recognize why teenagers feel quite sleepy often and how to fix it. Easiest blame-targets are mobile phones and computers along with homework and extra-curricular activities.

High tech gadgets, technology and schoolwork do have their place in sleep deprivation, these reasons aren’t the entire problem among teens and always being “just tired.” Most people don’t understand that if teens don’t start trying to alter their sleep habits, long-lasting damage, such as difficulties with weight, mood and grades, could occur. Read the rest of this entry

sunita williams actiwatchTo develop measures to improve the quality and duration of sleep in space, scientists are conducting the Sleep — Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight — Long investigation or Sleep-Long. This study examines the sleep — wake patterns of the crew members while they are aboard the space station.

The quality and duration of slumber impact human health, attitude, and ability to focus. The Institute of Medicine released a report in 2006 stating that chronic sleep loss could lead to hypertension, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke and multiple psychiatric disorders. Crew members spend years training for missions on strenuous schedules and then, when they finally reach the space station, their coordinated timetable does not allow for hitting the snooze button.

The Sleep — Long investigation uses an objective approach to monitoring sleep by having the crew wear an Actiwatch. This device, which resembles a wristwatch, monitors sleep/wake activity using a miniature accelerometer that records crew movement. The Actiwatch also measures the ambient light conditions during the study. There is a subjective element to the investigation, as well, in which the crew maintains a daily sleep log for the duration of one week, every third week while aboard the space station.

Scientists compare sleep-wake activity and light exposure patterns from the data obtained in orbit with the baseline data collected on Earth. Results from the investigation may lead to changes in lighting requirements, sleep shifting schedules and workload plans for future space station occupants.

The study may also help to indicate when additional measures are needed to minimize the risks of sleep deprivation in orbit. Findings from the study will not only benefit the crew of the space station for the immediate future, but also have important implications for future long-duration exploration. Such findings may also provide improved sleep aids for those suffering from insomnia here on Earth, as well as benefit shift workers, such as hospital, law enforcement, and military staff.

Read Complete Article By by Jessica NimonNASA’s Johnson Space Center

Scientists say sleep deprivation also slows your metabolism down as well. Researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden found that insomnia could encourage you to pile on the pounds by slowing down the rate at which the body burns calories.

Study leader Christian Benedict, said: ‘Our findings show that one night of sleep deprivation acutely reduces energy expenditure in healthy men, which suggests sleep contributes to the acute regulation of daytime energy expenditure in huma

Older studies have linked sleep deprivation with weight gain and also shown how disrupted sleep also disrupts levels of stress – and hunger-related hormones during waking hours. Read the rest of this entry

A new analysis has found that childhood cancer survivors often suffer  from sleep problems and fatigue, which negatively impact their  attention and memory. Published early online in Cancer, a  peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that addressing sleep hygiene among  survivors of childhood cancer may help to improve their cognitive  health.

Cognitive problems, such as trouble with attention and memory, often  arise in survivors of childhood cancer. These problems, which are either  a direct or indirect result of treatment, negatively impact future  education, employment, and the ability to live independently.

To assess the effects of fatigue and sleep disruption on cognitive  function in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, Kevin Krull, PhD,  of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis and his team  evaluated a questionnaire filled out by 1,426 individuals from the  Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. (The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  was designed to investigate the long-term medical, psychosocial, and  functional health of survivors of eight different childhood cancers who  were treated between 1970 and 1986.) Read the rest of this entry

Recent studies have linked sleep loss and sleep disorders to health problems such as depression, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke. The latest findings in sleep research will be presented and discussed by more than 5,000 scientists and sleep specialists when the SLEEP 2011 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC convenes at the Minneapolis Convention Center from June 13 to 15.

More than 1,000 research abstracts will be presented at SLEEP 2011. The scientific program also includes symposia, clinical workshops and discussion groups on topics ranging from neuroscience and genetics to dreams, sleep deprivation and aging. Clinical sleep specialists will discuss current practices in the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders such as insomnia, narcolepsy and sleep apnea.

“Sleep has an impact on virtually every aspect of our daily lives, including our daytime alertness, job performance, mental wellness, physical health and longevity,” said Dr. H. Craig Heller, chair of the APSS program committee. “The information presented during SLEEP 2011 will help the medical community promote healthy sleep habits and provide appropriate medical care for the 50 million to 70 million people in the U.S. who suffer from a chronic sleep disorder.”

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